Marking the Unseen: “HERE, DATA” by Gabrielle Mertz at SL Gallery

Wenesday, Jan 30th from 6-9 pm marks the opening of the exhibition HERE, DATA by Gabrielle Mertz at SL Gallery (335 West 38th Street, New York, NY).

An exhaustive look into the various ways in which data pervades our everyday lives, HERE, DATA re-imagines pathways by which these unseen interventions can be translated into an experiential, participatory artworks. Mertz possesses the uncanny ability to convey the process by which data gets transferred into stunning visuals and installation. Works that appear to be abstract and subjective actually express data sets, in some cases taken in real-time, augmenting and imaginatively capturing the nuances of the world surrounding us. A world that mostly remains invisible comes to life in HERE, DATA.

installation view of Gabrielle Mertz’s HERE, DATA, at SL Gallery (courtesy the artist)

On view through March 22, 2019, HERE, DATA brings news and film media into the physical realm. While some works are on view in the gallery itself, more works can be accessed via cell phone/tablet. Part of the artist’s Album series, these digital works bring an intimate, carefully structured viewing experience to the visitor.

Mertz is a New York-based visual artist and choreography who works across sound, light and installation. Her site-specific works have been exhibited in the US and abroad in Europe at a variety of venues such as the New Museum Ideas City, Cultural Center of Krakow, Rialto Center for Performing Arts and more. HERE, DATA remains on view at SL Gallery (335 West 38th Street) through March 22, 2019 – for further information, please contact Tony Long at the Gallery, or visit our website www.sl.gallery/

A Space for Oddities at Contra Gallery: David Henry Nobody Jr Opens Jan 31st

There’s room for every oddity and eccentricity imaginable at David Henry Nobody Jr’s upcoming exhibit, Fake Smears and Facial Food Fiascos, opens at Contra Gallery (122 W 26th Fl 6) in Chelsea, NYC on Jan 31st from 6-8 pm. David Henry Nobody Jr will present an irreverent and (slightly) grotesque portrait series melding the stylings of Flemish food art from the Dutch Golden Age of Painting with Contemporary Pop Photography. These “Resemblages” will blend the artist’s features with a fantastic array of produce and processed foods.

works on view as part of “Fake Smears and Facial Food Fiascos” at Contra Gallery (courtesy the artist)

 

Featuring an evening of live interactive performance by the infamous artist, Fake Smears and Facial Food Fiascos builds on a career the artist has sustained via his prominent artistic antics, including impersonating socialite Alex von Furstenberg. Creating sensational art in the vein of Andy Warhol’s Factory antics and Dada performance and surrealism, David Henry Nobody Jr slyly pokes fun at the highbrow views of the fine art establishment.

 

works on view as part of “Fake Smears and Facial Food Fiascos” at Contra Gallery (courtesy the artist)

An internationally renowned artist and provocateur, David Henry Nobody Jr. is based in New York City. His creative “actions” and objects include the “Human Weeble Wobble”, and in Nobody Jr. predicted the Trump presidency in his 1999 “Stalking Trump” series in which he tried to meet Donald Trump as many times as possible in one year. David is a founding member of the Fantastic Nobodies, a renegade/outsider/performance art collective, which was a collaboration of five artists from the years 2003-2013. The Nobodies have shown at Andrew Edlin Gallery and at WhiteBox gallery. David Henry Nobody Jr.’s work has been featured on the BBC, VICE, The Creators Project, Insider, Observer, and Whitehot Magazine.Fake Smears and Facial Food Fiascos is on view at Contra Gallery, 122 W 26th St Floor 6 from Thursday, Jan 31 – Feb 15, 2019.

The Thrill of Trill Matrix at The Abrazo Interno Gallery, Clemente Soto Vélez Center

Occasionally an art exhibit meets a space perfectly suited to its concept;  this is happily the case with Trill Matrixon view through Jan 19th at the Abrazo Interno Gallery, Clemente Soto Vélez Center. Trill Matrix, conceived as a site-specific exhibit for the Center, is curated by artist Elizabeth Riley and features works by contemporary artists Nancy Baker, Jaynie Crimmins, Christina Massey, Elizabeth Riley, Christine Romanell, Linda K. Schmidt and Etty Yaniv. These artists frequently exhibit collectively: while each is firmly rooted in their own unique artistic practice, their dialogues and discussion form interstices linking the works on view in Trill Matrix. Showcasing a blend of sculpture, mixed media, and installation works, Trill Matrix showcases ways in which contemporary art can tease our senses. From texture to color, volume to light, Trill Matrix teases aspects of reality into new, uncharted territory for all who visit. On view at the The Abrazo Interno Gallery (107 Suffolk Street) through January 19, make sure to visit during the show’s final days – if you can, catch the closing party on Sat, 1/19! Free and open to the public – come and celebrate art while also celebrating the network of women artists behind the works, a perfect way to close out the Women’s March events in NYC!

 

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Christina Massey, “Crafty Collusion 2” on view in Trill Matrix.

 

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Elizabeth Riley, “Prototype 2 – Canopy” on view in Trill Matrix.

In Trill Matrix, “trill” alludes to a moment in hip-hop culture where the words “true” and “real” blended together to suggest authenticity and cultural ascendancy. Playing off this idea of reconciling two distinct words, artists on view in the exhibit remix disparate mediums to form new hybrids. Strips of fabric gathered together form a soft-sculpture-turned-light-installation, while works composed of glass and aluminum fragments hold court with another work re-claiming electronic wires and plastic into a single immersive sculpture. The network these works forms invites closer inspection, often bringing the visitor to realize a greater understanding of the beauty that lies in waste.

Christina Massey is one of the exhibiting artists whose works present the meeting point of upcycled materials and careful composition. The artist’s Crafty Collusions series brings together fragments from upcycled craft beer cans with a blend of other materials, cleverly juxtaposing the male-dominated industry of craft beer with the “femininity” of crafting. Massey reflected on the work involved in bridging the gaps while making mixed media artworks. “The materials in themselves bring certain complications, where one material doesn’t easily adhere to another,” noted Massey. “A certain amount of experimentation has to be done to find the right glues, mixture of paint, thickness of thread, etc., but I love that experimentation, that’s where you discover new things that maybe you didn’t realize were a possibility. That can be very freeing…  just allowing yourself to manipulate, play and learn, admitting that the material is going to have a certain mind of its own.”

Elizabeth Riley‘s artwork, “Prototype 2 – Canopy”, slows down new media by imprinting video stills onto paper and fusing these frozen scenes with aluminum, paint and duralar, a form of acetate. Fusing different modes of representation and interpretation, Riley questions our subjective experience of reality – whether through new means of looking and questioning or by forcing the viewer to re-think what they are observing in her mixed-media works.

Artist Jaynie Crimmins similarly plays with both ideas around reality depicted through material and notions attached to craft. The artist shreds promotional mail she receives – catalogs, flyers, etc – into minute pieces that she then re-arranges into abstract geometric compositions. Reminiscent of the cardinal directions and visually capturing a format found in the most ancient cultures, Crimmins compiles works with muted color tones and fantastic textures to witness that one woman’s trash can become the world’s treasure.

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Jaynie Crimmins, “A Field Guide to Getting Lost#7” on view in Trill Matrix.
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Linda K. Schmidt, “Panels 50+51+52+53” on view in Trill Matrix.

Linda K. Schmidt‘s work embodies another style of geometric abstraction, with strips of semi-sheer fabrics in block colors meticulously arranged to form striped patterns. Evoking stained glass windows or dress-making patterns, Schmidt brings color field painting and craft together in one transcendental visual form. Suspended from the floor, larger than life size, these installations induce a sense of wonder in visitors encountering her installations at Trill Matrix.

Works by Nancy Baker display a skillful assimilation of sublimation into striking visual compositions. Recalling networks of neurons, or perhaps a private eye’s visuals connecting elements of an investigation,  Baker’s installation for Trill Matrix ventures as many layers deep as the visitor is willing to explore. A New Yorker by birth, Baker also plays off the idea of linked infrastructure such as that found in the NYC subway; yet, her compositions incorporate found language indicating our current social anxiety and uncertainty.

 

Nancy Baker, “Shredded Cold Victory” (detail image), on view in Trill Matrix.
Christine Romanell, “Dah Noqte” on view in Trill Matrix.

Artist Etty Yaniv plays with color and texture to reference abstracted nature through sublimely arranging upcycled materials into organic, yet repetitive, patterns. Blending networks of cords and cables into fragments of materials from discarded paintings and used plastic, Yaniv draws out the inherent beauty of detritus. Her work plays with notions related to unity and disparity, tracing harmony and dissonance through her playful use of scale and masterful composition.

Christine Romanell‘s work brings mathematical formulae and data analysis into the visual arts sphere. Applying color to patterns derived through mathematical equations, yet identifying where math also traverses organic and non-repetitive functions, Romanell’s installations make visual the corners of rationale and analysis where making sense begins to break down: with beautiful results.

Don’t miss the final days of Trill Matrix! Make sure to witness for yourself this stunning survey of the possibilities present within a mindful collection of connected yet disparate mixed media artistic practices.

Treat America Project a Refreshing Survey of Contemporary Artists Across the US

A camouflage-wrapped La-Z-Boy chair languishes on a fishing pier in Virginia. Rows of milk cartons line the refrigerated shelves in a Wisconsin grocery store. Views from across America feature in the photography which forms the basis of the migratory “Treat America Project”, a group exhibit curated by Jon Feinstein of Humble Arts Foundation and Jamie Martinez of The Border project space that features a single artist from each state across America. Featured on the @treatamericaproject Instagram page over the course of 2018, artists will have a chance to see their work shine in person at two spaces in New York City in 2019.

Treat America Project at Foley Gallery, Jan 9 through 13

 

Celebrating the diversity of the United States under a unified banner of creative artistic license, even during an era of stark political division, this wide range of artists – juried by Feinstein and Martinez – have translated their vision of their home states via compelling imagery featured on both the project’s Instagram page, Facebook page and website. The project makes good on its aim to bring art to the service of the greater good: each artist was invited to select a charitable organization, with a portion of proceeds of art print sales going to each cause. An exercise in contemporary art and goodwill, the Treat America project allows a window into this urgent hour of dialogue, exchange and creativity.

View of Oshkosh, Wisconsin for Treat America Project by artist Sherri Nienass Littlefield

 

The Treat America Project will be on view in New York City in two iterations: first at Foley Gallery, 59 Orchard Street NYC (Jan 9-13th, 2019) followed by an exhibit at OSNY Project Space, 417 W. 57th Street NYC (Feb 8-17th). The project is sponsored by Treat Gallery, an online exhibition initiative benefiting a wide array of emerging artists, businesses, communities and charitable organizations since its founding in 2016.

Works by Ruben Natal-San Miguel for Treat America Project, curated by Jamie Martinez and Jon Feinstein

 

Detail from image by Treat America Project artist for Tennessee, Kayla Caron