AHA Fine Art Brings Bold Forms to CONTEXT Miami

Embracing a range of artistic mediums, from sculpture and tapestry to painting and mixed media, AHA Fine Art’s Booth C8 at Miami’s CONTEXT art fair holds promise as a bright spot in the firmament of Miami Art Week. On view from Dec 3-8, 2019, CONTEXT is located in downtown Miami on Biscayne Bay and features art dealers displaying work by promising contemporary artists. AHA Fine Art will feature nine artists whose style spans a wide range of mediums and conceptual approaches, bringing together Vincent Arcilesi, Alex Callender, John Defeo, Jen Dwyer, India Evans, Rachel Grobstein, Nola Romano, Arlene Rush and Andrea von Bujdoss.

Rachel Grobstein and Jen Dwyer mine the existing visual language of sculpture ranging from vernacular to Neoclassical. Grobstein’s sculptures incorporate everyday objects at miniature scale, inviting visitors to intimately experience these presumed precious objects. Her carefully encyclopedic approach gestures toward the archival styles of Camille Henrot, among others, while maintaing a distinct aesthetic. Dwyer’s boundary-pushing artwork advances contemporary ceramics at the crossroads of ancient and modern, Orient and Occident. The artist recently completed her MFA, and has pursued various opportunities to study ceramics in China, Vermont and Upstate New York – all of which have steered and developed her work, which exudes a sophisticated yet subversive approach.

“Roadside Memorial”, Rachel Grobstein, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami
“Venus Vase”, Jen Dwyer, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami

 

Arlene Rush (featured photo) also approaches her practice with a subversive, conceptual mindset. The interdisciplinary artist dives into a treasure trove of kitsch and classical elements for her installation work, which both criticizes and soberly comments on contemporary economic and social values, inviting visitors to form their own opinions on the meanings inherent to systems which govern us.

At CONTEXT, AHA Fine Art also presents paintings by landscape and figurative artists that present something for everyone: lovers of fresh, contemporary color and classic, clean line. Alex Callender’s paintings invite wonder and dreamy speculation, embracing classical figuration and engulfing them in bright pastel shades. Her work combines beauty and critical art historical studies. John Defeo’s neo-impressionist landscapes present figures in moody environs, while the powerful scale of Vincent Arcilesi’s landscape paintings evince a technical precision carefully balanced with a harmony of line and color.

“Untitled – Yellow” Alex Callender, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami
“Trees of Charlevoix”, Vincent Arcilesi, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami
“Nightswimming”, John Defeo, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami

 

Don’t miss the opportunity to experience the diverse range of artworks on view at AHA Fine Art’s C8 booth at CONTEXT Art Miami. On view December 3-8, 2019 in downtown Miami, the fair offers a view onto artists on the rise today – and AHA Fine Art presents some of the most talented rising voices on the art scene today.

Excitement Mounts for Pelham Art Center’s Studio Café on November 16, 2019

Saturday, November 16 marks an exciting day for guests to Pelham Art Center: the center’s annual Fall fundraiser, Studio Café, offers a smorgasbord of wonderful activities for attendees. From 7 pm on, Pelham Art Center (155 Fifth Ave, Pelham, NY) will play host to delightful artists, musicians, local food + drink treats and even the launch of new exhibit: “Collectibles”, featuring works priced to sell at under $2500 by artists Laurence Belotti, Capucine Bourcart, Alvin Clayton,  Bob Clyatt, Mayuko Fujino, Maizianne, RC Hagans, Eileen Karakashian, Doug Newton and Alexis Trice. Studio Café offers a chance for visitors to experience all that Pelham Art Center has to offer while supporting the center’s education and community programs. With general admission (entry from 7 pm) available for a reasonable $95 and VIP advance 6 pm entry priced at $145, your ticket to arts access is on sale now. An online auction – live now! – also offers the opportunity to secure limited editions and unique works by distinguished artists with all proceeds benefiting the Center.

Auction artwork available for purchase by artist Ann Lewis – Proceeds support Pelham Art Center

Community members come together around the meaningful art experiences offered by the Pelham Art Center for this fundraiser event, with event co-chairs Michelle Acosta and Julie Cepler leading the way! Live art demos will be helmed by notable teaching artists Donna Ross and Frank Guida, with live music by jazz musicians Dan Haedicke (DH4 Music) and vocalist Sarah Rayani. Later in the evening, DJ Lightbolt (aka renowned artist Nicky Enright) will bring guests to their feet with some fun and funky beats.

 

Artwork by notable artists such as Ruben Natal San Miguel, whose work will be featured in an upcoming exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, is included alongside other established artists Shepard Fairey, Ann Lewis, Kate Fauvell, Katy Garry, David Kramer and more in this exclusive Fall fundraiser auction.

 

In addition to the fundraiser’s impressive auction offerings, special 1’x1′ $250 artworks specially made for the event by distinguished artists Arlene Rush, Susan Saas, Kate Fauvell, Charlotte Mouquin, Gabriel Shuldiner and more will be available exclusively to event attendees. Craft brew will be provided by Wolf + Warrior and delicious culinary treats by Caffe Regatta, Canita Lobos, Elia Taverna, Manor Market, Pelham Pizza, Rockwells, and many more. What are you waiting for?  Tickets available now for this exclusive annual event.

 

Auction artwork available for purchase by artist Christina Massey – Proceeds support Pelham Art Center

 

Word Up! A Standout Moment for Text-Based Art at C24 Gallery


In an era rampant with political protest and 
the multitudinous voices of social media, Word Up!- co-curated by Sharon Louden at C24 Gallery, knows what’s up.

Installation view featuring installation “Moral History” by Karen Finley for C24’s Word Up!

Word Up! marks an exhibition that takes risks and is rewarded with a keen grasp of contemporary self-expression. Considering a contemporary art scene saturated more than ever with sociopolitical viewpoints, the time is more than ripe for this exquisite-and timely-exhibition. Featuring works by Liana Finck, Deborah Kass, Karen Finley, Meg Hitchcock and many more, this exhibit marks fearless departure into the diverse ways in which words infiltrate and emerge in contemporary art.

Spanning interdisciplinary artistic practices, this contemporary survey show featured video, photography, installation, painting and mixed media. Karen Finley’s incisive, provocative and genuinely humorous installation, located on the exhibit’s lower level, provides a stunning focal point from which to consider the contemporary art lexicon engulfing the viewer in Word Up! Comprised of archival materials assembled as a centrepiece – a la Judy Chicago’s Dinner Table, if you will – Finley has annotated the materials she has presented to create a thought-provoking work centered around representation, identity and exclusion. Clever illustrations by renowned artist Liana Finck and the inundating, undulating works by Meg Hitchcock also prove to be standouts in this stunning exhibition. Presentation is key, and visitors are grabbed at the entrance by a video work by artist David Krippendorff, whose work also inhabits space on the lower level near Karen Finley’s installation. Hrag Vartanian  and Deborah Kass, art critic and artist and notable public artist respectively, also have work on view in this carefully curated presentation of works written expressly into the social consciousness that forms the fabric of contemporary text-based artistic practice.

“Persephone” Meg Hitchcock, installation view in “Word Up!”

Word Up! is on view at C24 gallery from 9/26-11/9/2019.

 

 

Illuminating the “Unseen”: Collar Works in Troy, NY Elevates Contemporary Artists

Artworks on view in the deceptively subtle exhibition “Unseen” bring that which is frequently overlooked directly into the public eye. In a world in which most of what directs our behavior goes unnoticed, “Unseen” marks the clever, perceptive type of exhibit that we crave to focus our attention on. Curated by the MFA Boston’s Akili Tommasino for Collar Works, artists on view include Carris Adams, Tania Alvarez, Aurora Andrews, Jose- Aurelio Baez, Raina Briggs, Ryan Chase Clow, Matt Crane, Richard Deon, Carla Dortic, Deborah Druick, Mark Eisendrath, Rebecca Flis, Gigi Gatewood, Chet Gold, Victoria van der Laan, Jesse Meredith, Sarah Pater, James Marshall Porter, Jr., Anne- Audrey Remarais, Eric Souther, Susanna Starr, Paula Stuttman, and Sarah Sweeney. Works by Mark Eisendrath and Susanna Starr  in particular sweep into focus, with a distinctive attention to line and form. Spanning sculpture and painting with a hint of lyric poetry, “Unseen” follows those elements that both direct and elude our line of sight. 

The unseen can be that which is literally unresolved: that which exists up to a point, then inhabits the realm of both the unseen and the unknown. Artist Mark Eisendrath notes of his work Mysterioso, on view in “Unseen,” “Mysterioso existed only as an idea- not seen or felt. It did not exist, neither did the process I used to make it. It was quite literally- a mystery. ” That which cannot be seen or felt can still hold a palpable presence in our lives. As the curator of “Unseen” notes in her exhibition text, “…the complex algorithms that reinforce our behavior remain hidden to us. Our fear of being unseen makes us susceptible to manipulation.” By making that which is foreign to us palpable, “Unseen” offers the viewer a clever, nuanced portrait of contemporary society.

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“Mysterioso” by artist Mark Eisendrath (acquired by a new collector) “Unseen” at Collarworks, Troy, NY

Susanna Starr and Mark Eisendrath share a penchant for uncovering the sought for-yet undiscovered- form. Curves and delineated lines trace the patterns of our subconscious seeking that which we do not yet know. A mysterious, yet visceral, presentation of new works by contemporary sculptors, painters and mixed-media artists, “Unseen” is a careful selection of artworks that transcend the ordinary in search of a greater meaning beyond the immediately visible.

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Installation view of “Unseen” feat. “Bring It” by Mark Eisendrath

“Unseen” is on view at Collar Works art space in Troy, NY, through Dec 14, 2019.

Avant-Kitchen: Art for a New Dinner Party in the Spaghetti-O Incident

Produced by The Hive, an interdisciplinary art community based in Brooklyn, NY, “The Spaghetti-O Incident” dissects cultural references from Guns n’Roses to Martha Rosler in an examination of gendered expectations and hetero-normativity. Curated by Yasmeen Abdallah, Kathie Halfin and Ameta Wegryzn, the exhibit – occurring at 1218 Prospect Ave in Oct 2019 – features a range of interdisciplinary artists including Julia Blume, Victoria Calabro, Kat Cope, Pei-Ling Ho, Sarah Dineen, Vyczie Dorado, Ariel Kleinberg, Alison Owen, Muhajir Subuur Lesure, Jean Carla Rodea, Jordan Segal and Yasmeen Abdallah. Works on view range from performance to photography, installation to sculpture. Examining the expectations placed upon women – as artists, homemakers, cooks, and human beings – “The Spagetti-O Incident” doesn’t shy away from provocative and subversive works questioning and thwarting ideas of identity and performativity.

Sculpture by Jordan M Segal for “The Spaghetti-O Incident”

Gender is digested through performance that takes place in a residence: the living space provides a non-neutral scenario for the exhibit loaded with valuable context. The white cube is denied the privilege of sterilizing these powerful works on view by Kat Cope, Pei-Ling Ho, Sarah Dineen, Yasmeen Abdallah, Jordan Segal & more. The weight of the body and gender in domestic spaces, such as the kitchen, is keenly felt in this artist-curated show. Many artists reflect on ideas of food, meals, and the domestic sphere, with dishware by Jordan Segal seemingly dissolving into itself, reminiscent of cake frosting or, more morbidly, melted skin. Kat Cope’s work similarly addresses the topic of skin: specifically, clothing as a type of armor that adheres to and protects the skin. Cope notes of her fiber-based installations that “like layers of skin, layers of fiber are resistant to tearing and puncture.” Blending together elements of fashion, protection, and performance, Kat Cope’s work lies at the boundary of  representation and installation.

Intrinsically linked with these ideas of gender and inequity are the experiences of the body as a home one inhabits. Performances by Vyczie Dorado, among others, display the full force of yearning and attachment that artists have to the corporeal. Connection, longing and expectation cradle the exhibition, with “The Spaghetti-O Incident” proving a necessary, essential exhibition for our contemporary moment. Intersectional feminism and bold experimentation combine to make this exhibit one formidable presentation in this Fall New York Art season.

Sculpture by Kat Cope left of performance by Vyczie Dorado for The Spaghetti-O Incident

 

“Noise” by Pei Ling Ho for The Spaghetti-O Incident

 

 

Artist Y.R. Egon Translates Longing Into Paintings

Y. R. Egon (Ruchira Amare) cuts a stylish, erudite figure.

Based in Brooklyn, NY, the artist arrived on the New York scene from her native Mumbai with an artistic and creative practice balancing influences from Europe and her native India. Her creative leanings are underpinned by a formidable education background in Engineering and Fashion Design. Learning under established Mumbai-based artists while concurrently pursuing a degree in Engineering from the University of Mumbai, Egon distills a wide range of influences into her impressionist, yet geometrically balanced, paintings. The artist holds a Fashion Design degree from the Parsons School of Design.

The artist sat down with ANTE. to discuss themes running through her work and what’s upcoming for her on the heels of exhibitions at Dacia Gallery, Six Summit Gallery, Rochester Contemporary Art Center and The Greenpoint Gallery.

Painter Y R Egon

ANTE.: Your work shows formal qualities linking to modernist greats such as Piet Mondrian. Do you see your practice as continuing a dialogue with modern abstract artists from the mid-20th century? 

Y.R.: I agree – yes. I have always followed Mondrian, Kazimir Malevich, Mark Rothko and Wassily Kandinsky. As Mondrian once said, “Abstract art is not the creation of another reality but the true vision of reality.” I try to have my own language and to express my emotions through my paintings.

ANTE.: Color and shape are important aspects in your paintings. How has your approach in forming connections between color and shape evolved from your studies to the present moment?

Y.R.: I have always cherished the emotion that comes out of nostalgia and longing for the past. I attempt to capture and preserve these emotions through my paintings. Over time I realized that there is a word for this behaviour in Finnish; that word is ‘kaiho,’ meaning a hopeless longing in which one feels incomplete and yearns for something unattainable or extremely difficult and tedious to attain. I use colour and shape and geometric-like patterns which are not truly geometric: these (patterns) have evolved over time and show some traces of reality.

ANTE.: Your formative education in art occurred when you were learning from painters based in India. How do you see your work forming a bridge between the Indian art canon and the Western art canon?

Y.R.: I did not have a formal art education but I studied under great and successful artists in India. I learnt many techniques from them that helped me translate and formulate my ideas using the medium of painting. I try to use my knowledge, my ideas, my inspirations and life experiences to formulate my thoughts. In the process, unintentionally I end up using different techniques and practices that span both the Indian and the Western art canon.

ANTE.: As a full-time artist, you are dedicated to painting and making art constantly; what are some of your goals in terms of exhibiting your paintings? Do you have a dream gallery you’d like to show with and/or museum or similar venue to show your work?

Y.R.: Being an ambitious artist, my goal is to better my art practice and art technique, evolve as a person through enriched life experience and to then translate that into my art and paintings. I fell in love with Gallery Perrotin the first time I went there to check out a show. The space is beautiful and dreamy. My artworks have a lot of colour but come out of the concept of dreams and it would be a dream to be able to exhibit at this space.

Lost Journey, Y.R. Egon Gouache on paper, 16″ x 20″, 2019

ANTE.: You are a poet and have trained as an engineer, alongside your work as an artist and fashion designer. How do you unite all of these disparate elements in your painting? Has it shaped how you approach art-making?

Y.R.: Yes, I studied Engineering and graduated from the University of Mumbai. I write poems but only to express my ideas through another medium. I studied Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design. I am in process of launching some garments/apparel that are inspired from my paintings from the ‘kaiho’ collection. Hence, I feel that even though they all are separate fields, it all boils down to an expression of ideas as they come together in a product or in works of art. I try to carry the same romantic feeling and emotion in all my works including my fashion illustrations. I specifically use watercolours for these, and in my next series of paintings, I plan to experiment more with watercolour in order to capture the haziness of the lost memories.

ANTE.: How has working in fashion impacted your work as a painter? Do you work with a variety of materials as a result? 

Y.R.: As a fashion designer, I stand by the principles of creative construction and sustainability. I use only natural fabrics and natural dyeing on them. I also use fabric as a medium to paint and specifically natural dyed fabric which is dyed with the colours made from plants such as logwood, madder and flowers such as marigold and berries as well. I also plan to make my own natural pigments from these plants and flowers and natural materials to paint on stretched fabrics such as cotton and silk.

ANTE.: More specifically, does your work as a painter shift in scale due to your background in the fashion industry?

Y.R.: I actually am not that experimental or easily accepting to change. Hence, I try to usually paint in a certain style and on a certain size as well. But again, the scale changes a bit when it is translated on apparel or fabric paintings.

Colorful Houses, Y.R. Egon Gouache on paper, 16″ x 20″, 2019

ANTE.: You’re now based in Brooklyn, NY, and have exhibited with The Greenpoint Gallery and Dacia Gallery. How does living in NYC impact your practice as an artist?

Y.R.: NYC is very dynamic and inspirational, Brooklyn specifically is the epicentre for the modern, contemporary and experimental art that is not commercial. I recently exhibited at the ‘Space 776’ as a part of their Bushwick open studios which was covered by Hyperallergic magazine! I find Brooklyn as a very important factor of my stay in the city and is very inspirational and also motivational to see and meet other artists and their work. I have exhibited at various galleries in Manhattan and Brooklyn and that serves as a booster for myself and my art practice.

Performance is Alive x ANTE. Performance Picks at Satellite Art Show NYC Oct 3-6 2019

October 3-6 marks the inaugural edition of Satellite Art Show in Brooklyn, and along with that comes the most significant collection of live & recorded performance art ever presented by Performance is Alive.

ANTE. Mag is proud to serve as Media Sponsor for this groundbreaking performance art presentation by Performance is Alive – a survey of the most exciting emerging and mid-career performance/new media artists with an intersectional lens, representing a diverse group of bodies and identities. Don’t miss the full roster of Performance is Alive-curated programming, with two especially notable events occurring Friday, October 4th at 8 pm when notable artist Barbara Rosenthal discusses her work in tandem with a screening of “News to Fit the Family” and Saturday, October 5th at noon for “Queer Form: A Panel Discussion” centered around queer body politics in new media and performance – for full list of events, follow the Performance is Alive Schedule on their Facebook page and also available HERE.

AlisonPirie_PressImage2_PerformanceDocumentationbyLiaHanson - Alison Pirie
Alison Pirie for “Performance is Alive” Satellite Art Show NYC 2019

Now on to our Top 12 ANTE. Mag picks for Performance is Alive @ Satellite Art Show, October 3-6, 2019…

  1. Alison Pirie a juggernaut working across performance, installation, new media and more, Pirie juggles simultaneous explorations of gender, identity, language and sexuality: with a particular lens onto female sexuality and the concept of “female hysteria”. With past projects at LaMama Galeria in NYC and the Situation Room in LA, Pirie is a force of nature to be reckoned with in her powerful considerations of these contemporary themes. Make sure to experience her performance on opening night at Performance is Alive: she will be presenting her work Thursday, 10/3 at Satellite.
  2. Kathie Halfin – living and working in the Bronx, Russian-Israeli artist Halfin is an interdisciplinary artist working across installation, performance, sound and costume production. Her performances tease out the nuanced narratives attached to female objectification. Halfin holds an MFA from the School of Visual Arts, and is affiliated with Wassaic Project, Vermont Studio Center, the Bronx Museum and more.
  3. Amanda Hunt & IV Castellanos – a collaboration that has lent itself to a studied exploration in reciprocity through repetitive catching of one another’s bodies, Hunt & IV Castellanos sets the stage for a longed-for Queer and Feminist Utopia. The artists have performed in the US and abroad, creating a set of actions in tandem that seek to provoke audiences to re-examine social approaches to equanimity and labor.
  4. SUNGJAE LEE – based in Chicago, LEE is a multidisciplinary artist whose work investigates periphery and its relationship to center. An MFA Graduate in Performance from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, LEE has presented works in the US, Canada, and South Korea among other locations. The artist’s candid and perceptive responses to other-ing augment Performance is Alive’s 2019 programming.
  5. Wild Actions (Patience, Carley McCready-Bingham, Ginger Wagg) – Hailing from North Carolina, Wild Actions presents a sculpture garden for Performance is Alive that presents their focus on interactive performance installations. Their radical, performative and eco-conscious approach marks a breath of fresh air among the PIA presentations.
  6. Barbara Rosenthal – A conceptual artist working across (seemingly) limitless mediums, Rosenthal’s inclusion into Performance is Alive is a true coup. The artist will be present on Friday, Oct 4 for a screening – as noted above – and any true connoisseurs of performance and conceptual art should be in attendance. Based in the West Village, Rosenthal has influenced modern art and philosophy: influence which continues to exert its presence through her projects based in the present day.
  7. Nadja Verena Marcin – An artist working across borders in Germany and the United States, Marcin’s multidisciplinary work across photography, video, and more exudes a deceptive straightforward quality. The artist engages across a broad platform of eco-conservation, feminism, and sociopolitical inquiry. Catch her work while you can on view at Performance is Alive!
  8. Katina Bitsicas – Exploring trauma, crime and the psychological presence of architecture on the human psyche, “other”ing and the personal experiences driving overarching social justice issues. A new media artist who has shown in the US and abroad, Bistsicas’ work delves deep into issues that are driving contemporary political discourse in the United States.
  9. Tales Frey – A founding member of eRevista Performatus, Frey’s artistic practice explores elements relating to body and ritual. A multidisciplinary artist, works by Frey have been exhibited across Latin America and Europe and involve incisive visual constructions to form social commentaries.
  10. Sylvain Souklaye – A sound, video and performance artist, Souklaye contrats personal narrative with collective memory, identity and demographic. His works have been shown in Europe and Latin America, and involve performative acts by the artist as well as interaction with diverse populations in disparate urban centers.
  11. Cherrie Yu – Yu’s work mines pop culture and performativity in equal measure through a practice rooted in new media and performance. Ideals attached to assignations such as “queer” and “open” are interrogated through surveys of existing bodies of work by and by placing the spectator in a dissociative state in relationship to other “bodies” – such as in interdisciplinary performance and new media installation. Yu’s new media work will be displayed as part of “Performance is Alive”.
  12. Rachel L. Rampleman – Brooklyn-based artist Rampleman explores identity and spectacle – intimacy and grandeur – through a multi-disciplinary lens. With solo exhibits in the US and abroad, the artist’s work delves into the latent tension underlying masculine and feminine identities.

Clockwise from upper left: Artists featured at Performance is Alive include Kathie Halfin, Igor Furtado and Sylvain Souklaye.

ABOUT PERFORMANCE IS ALIVE
Based in Brooklyn, NYC, Performance Is Alive is an online platform featuring the work and words of current performance art practitioners. Through interviews, artist features, sponsorship and curatorial projects, we aim to support the performance community while offering an access point to the performance curious. Performance is Alive at SATELLITE ART SHOW is curated by Quinn Dukes (Founder + Director). | performanceisalive.com

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ANTE. Mag is dedicated to bringing under-the-radar contemporary artists to a wider audience. To this end, ANTE.’s Editorial team specifically focuses on highlighting works by intersectional artists and cultural producers to our readership. If you believe you are working on a project that fits this description and deserves wider recognition, please email our editor: audra@antemag.com

America’s Diverse Social Tapestry Shines with “IN/FLUX” on view at Pelham Art Center

by Elizabeth Barenis

 

On view at Pelham Art Center through November 2nd, “IN/FLUX” – co-curated by PAC Director Charlotte Mouquin and Gallery Advisory Board Member Victoria Rolett – features works by compelling contemporary artists wielding their perspectives on immigration as expressed through various mediums. Ranging from photography to painting, installation art to collage, artists on view don’t shy away from aspects of immigration – positive and negative – that have shaped the scope of their respective artistic practices. Artists on view include Corina S. Alvarezdelugo, Selin Balci, Nicky Enright, Jenny Polak, Alejandra Hernandez, David Rios Ferreira, Omid Shekari, Ruben Natal San Miguel, Natalia Nakazawa and Victoria-Idongesit Udondian. The works exude a sense that the wider narrative diversity brings to the table creates a more intriguing contemporary art experience.

The Republic of Unknown Territory by Victoria-Idongesit Udondian for IN/FLUX

Visitors to this unique survey exhibition are greeted at the entrance by sounds of immigrants reflecting on their experiences as captured by Victoria-Idongesit Udondian for her installation, “The Republic of Unknown Territory.” Various articles of clothing are scattered throughout the space, suspended in hidden narratives that allude to both the absence and presence of their owners.

Engaged with the macro, rather than micro, elements of immigration, artist Natalia Nakazawa creates a map of woven threads manifesting the journeys that immigrants have taken to start new lives for themselves in their chosen homes. Denoting trade and travel along immigrant pathways, Nakazawa creates her works by incorporating participation into her process. Similarly engaged with fabrics and mixed materials, this work contrasts with Udondian’s installation in its bird’s-eye view of the effects which immigration exerts on an international scale.

Our Stories of Migration tapestry by Natalia Nakazawa for IN/FLUX

Ferreira’s pop-infused postcolonial drawings peel apart the layers of mythology and truth that comprise each immigrant’s personal history as well as society’s response to immigration. The colorful hues spanning intricate drawings in Ferreira’s works speak to an overarching, allegorical immigrant experience: a wider narrative that embraces aspects of varying sociopolitical relationships and international transportation.

Similarly engaged with maps, travel and transportation, Corina S. Alvarezdelugo’s collage works meld imagery unpacking the emotional weight of what lays near and far, subjects both intimate and remote.

David Rios Ferreira with his Drawings for the opening of IN/FLUX

 

Corina S. Alvarezdelugo’s Pangaea for IN/FLUX

On view at Pelham Art Center from September 20-November 2nd, “IN/FLUX” will host a variety of immigration-themed programming over the course of its time at the Center. These events include:

Afro-Puerto Rican Bomba celebration with BombaYo! – Sunday, Sept. 22nd 2-4pm
Diwali the Hindu festival of lights – Sunday, Oct. 6th 2-4pm
Mexican Day of the Dead – Sunday, Oct. 27th 2-4pm
There will be additional performance art during ArtsFest weekend Oct. 4-6th

Jay Milder’s “Unblotting the Rainbow” Hosts Official Opening Sept 27

Friday, September 27th marks the grand opening celebration of painter Jay Milder’s formidable “Unblotting the Rainbow”, curated by Adam Zucker and on view at the Provincetown Art Association & Museum through Nov 10, 2019.

“Animistic Ark” (2015) Jay Milder

 

“Unblotting the Rainbow” marks a pivotal moment in Milder’s career: the painter, already a household name in Brazil, has an upcoming solo exhibition at the Casa de Mexico in Havana, Cuba in May 2020.

Born in Omaha, Milder exploded onto the scene alongside contemporaries Red Grooms and Claes Oldenberg, and his experimental approach to painting – focused through his intense reflections on spiritual mysticism – informing his changing artistic vision. At times abstract while adopting a scale of figurative elements over the years, the artist relies on elements such as Kabbalah and numerology to inform his compositions. A keen balance of formal qualities imbues his practice with a meditative presence. Works on view in “Unblotting the Rainbow” chart the artist’s continual progress from his roots as an emerging artist in the 1950s through today. As curator Adam Zucker notes, “(the exhibit) focus(es)…on his use of painterly Expressionism as a means to address physical and spiritual themes affecting the human condition. For Milder, it’s a return to exhibiting in Provincetown, a community that had a tremendous impact on his career.” The artist began an ongoing relationship with the Provincetown area in the late 1950s, maintaining links to the area and experiencing formative days and months learning from others in the close knit community. A homecoming of sorts for the artist, Milder continues to push artistic boundaries while maintaining his place as a premiere artist advancing American modern expressionism.

Noah’s Ark #1 (2002) Jay Milder


Along with an opening to the public on Friday, August 27 from 8 pm on, the artist will also be giving a talk on Sunday, August 29 at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum from 1 pm. See the PAAM’s website for more details: https://www.paam.org/exhibitions/jay-milder-unblotting-the-rainbow/

Joan Walton’s Transcendent Works Shine in “Montauk Love Song”

“Montauk Love Song” celebrates its opening on Thursday, Sept 27 from 6-8 pm at Atlantic Gallery, suite 540, 547 W 27th street NYC. The opening is free and open to the public and the artist will be present.