Uncovering Top Exhibits on View at Art Miami 2019

Navigating the complex paths presented to visitors at Art Miami is no small feat. Faced with the mountain of galleries on view, we’ve pulled together a handy reference guide for must-see presentations at this year’s Art Miami. Located at One Herald Plaza in Miami (NE 14th Street and Biscayne Bay,) the fair shares the grounds with its sister fair, Context.

From secondary market prospects to mid-career artists, Art Miami marks a diverse cross-section of modern and contemporary art reflecting a wide assembly of tastes. From the merging of digital and material to the large-scale mid-century modernists, no other fair holds quite the range of gems on display at Art Miami.

Make sure to survey the show, and keep an eye out for the following art galleries (Booth numbers indicated below.)

Kenneth Noland, “Mysteries: Wild at Heart” at Helwaser Gallery (Art Miami 2019) Courtesy of Helwaser Gallery, New York. Photography: Hadi Fallaphisheh

Helwaser Gallery (AM521) – Featuring sculpture, mixed media and works on paper, Helwaser’s presentations span from the mid-century to late 20th century. “Shadenfreude” by John Chamberlain lies at the outskirts of the booth, enticing passersby, while various works by the likes of Noland, Condo and LeWitt offer insights into these artists’ practice. Helwaser’s clean and meticulous presentation only serve to heighten the quality of the artworks on view. A definite stop on any fair-goers list.

C24 Gallery (AM304) – Stunning combinations of scale and material wait to delight visitors to C24’s Art Miami presentation. Christian Vincent, Katja Loher and Mike Dargas present compelling visions at the booth, with Dargas’ paintings taking honey as a departure point for imagining new visual textures. Katja Loher’s mixed media digital installations confound, while Christian Vincent’s representational paintings leave narratives to the viewer’s imagination. Not far from the VIP lounge, C24 is easy to discover and well worth the visit.

“Veil 2” Christian Vincent at C24 Gallery (Art Miami 2019)

Berry Campbell (AM122) – Frank Wimberley and Syd Solomon steal the show at Berry Campbell gallery’s presentation, while stunning pieces by Nancy Graves, Elaine de Kooning and others round out an impressive survey of painters and mixed-media artists spanning from the post-war period to the present day. Wimberley’s ruminations on texture and minimalism alone feel shockingly contemporary. Syd Solomon’s work will be featured in an upcoming solo show at the Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, so take a peek at his works on view here to familiarize yourself with his style and deft mastery of color tones.

“Morning Lightsigns” Syd Solomon at Berry Campbell (Art Miami 2019)

 

Goya Contemporary (AM111) – Baltimore-based Goya Contemporary presents Louise Fishman and Louisa Chase along with Joyce J. Scott and Elizabeth Talford Scott at this compelling Art Miami presentation. Open over 20 years, Goya Contemporary and Goya-Girl Press play a definitive role in the arts community in Baltimore and have helped secure the legacy of Baltimore-based artists while also exhibiting international renowned artists such as Louise Bourgeois. This compelling survey of paintings and sculptures offers incredible access to modern and contemporary artists, particularly woman artists, in a fair that benefits from this diverse showing.

Joyce J Scott, “Lips” Goya Contemporary Art (Art Miami 2019)

The Bonnier Gallery (AM402) – Miami-based Bonnier Gallery presents inside looks into the practice of established artists such as Christo and Mark di Suvero. Featuring drawings, sculpture and mixed-media work, The Bonnier Gallery is a local stalwart with an international focus. Focused on minimalism and with significant conceptual art on hand, the gallery marks a breath of fresh air in a market leaning heavily on Pop Art. A must-see.

Christo, “Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (Packed)” The Bonnier Gallery (Art Miami 2019)

James Goodman Gallery (AM218) – Early works by Milton Avery and other mid-century Modern painters populate James Goodman Gallery’s Art Miami booth. The options for collectors seeking obscure works by artists in the established canon are endless. Jim Dine, Sam Francis and others populate the robust offerings on hand at James Goodman, with a range of paintings and sculpture greeting the visitor. Another centrally located booth on view, James Goodman Gallery is well worth checking out.

detail of a painting by Milton Avery, James Goodman Gallery (Art Miami 2019)

 

Whether seeking out a study by a Modern Master or seeking something fresh and contemporary, Art Miami has a wide array of gems hidden in plain sight. Grab a cocktail and wander through the fairs – a Frank Stella, Sol LeWitt or soon-to-be future Warhol awaits you out on the floor!

Digging Into the Interdisciplinary Practice of Roni Sherman Ramos

“I always think that my work speaks for itself, because I’m really a traditional painter.” -Roni Sherman Ramos

It’s morning, and shafts of light are pouring in through the windows of Ramos’ Brooklyn studio. Paintings on canvas jostle for attention with nearby works on paper, while ceramic works fill the remaning space. I carefully step through the space, afraid to awaken the spirits seemingly captured in Ramos’ elevated works: nighttime scenes – or are they abstractions with flecks of bright light winding through them? – share a wall with vibrant ochre red compositions that seem to leap for joy at being created. Ramos is studious – rarely a season goes by when she’s not pursuing professional development to deepen her understanding of her artistic practice. She is also reflective and thoughtful, ruminating on the painters and other interdisciplinary artists she has taken absorbed wisdom from. We spoke in November 2019 as she was celebrating the results of a recent trip to the kiln, diving into both her paintings – where her traditional roots lie as an artist – along with her work in the expanded field.

“Reflections” Roni Sherman Ramos, 36×36″ oil on linen

Roni Sherman Ramos: Even though my work is abstract, there are always elements viewers can understand…from a representational standpoint. People are always seeking familiar things in artworks – especially if they are abstract (works). I like to give viewers the freedom to find a mountain, or a face… before recently, I wasn’t even titling my work so that it could speak for itself. I’ve come to realize my work is rooted in nature and rooted in the land, and it has elements of land-driven [representation]… so I’m now calling these paintings abstract landscapes. Now, I’m embracing this impulse toward nature: it looks like nature to me, there’s no denying it.

ANTE. Mag: That’s a big leap!

RSR: Right, I’ve always tried to disguise this impulse before. I can deny it, and put lines through it or..

AM: …cover it in markings or…

RSR: …right or cover these in markings, or disguise it. But it remains. My process is a process of destroying, and re-inventing and resurrecting, as Amy Sillman says. I work in layers – sanding, scraping, destroying and then building [the work] up again and finding things from the past that rise to the surface, then making new marks.  What I strive toward is making sure there are a variety of marks: places where the eye can rest, and places where color leads the eye…agitation is present on other areas of the canvas. Tension and relationships are built through marks across the canvas. I include impasto as well in my works.  There’s always contrast – my work includes defined shapes and diffused shapes. Textures are also very important to me.

“Earth Wind Fire” Roni Sherman Ramos, 24×18″ oil on linen

AM: Can you walk us through your process? Some of the recent works from this Fall have almost an action-painting sensibility, showing brushstrokes and emblazoned areas of texture and scratches…

RSR: Marks and mark-making are both important parts of my practice. Texture as I mentioned is very important. I also love the work of Jackie Saccoccio, I’m a fan of her paint-drip heavy style and sometimes incorporate a similar sensibility but not always.

AM: Is there a new direction you’ve embarked on lately in your work? 

RSR: Lately with my oil paints I’ve incorporated using a heat gun into my process, using the heat gun on the freshly painted coat of oil on linen and exposing a bit of the layers below. This adds areas that build that feeling of agitation, I’ve learned to be careful when I use it as it takes a light touch.

AM: Is this the first time you’ve used the heat gun in your process?

RSR: I’ve used it before to dry water-based mediums, but this is the first time I’ve used it in my oils.

AM: Tell us about the works we are seeing here (featured in this article): are these all recent works? Say from the past two years?

RSR: These are all recent works, but honestly my paintings take a long time to make. Often I think I have control over the process, but eventually I realize the process has control over me. This is just what happens organically: you don’t always know what will happen or how you’ll do something that you’ll like

AM: So is this freeing for you or is it nerve wracking?

RSR: I like the serendipity of it, to a certain degree. Sometimes it’s disappointing but that’s ok, I know I can keep on going but it can take months until I see what I like. I always have more than one work in progress at any given time.

-ANTE. Mag

 

Damien Davis Empowers Discourse at LatchKey Gallery’s UNTITLED (Booth A7)

Foregrounding the artist’s upcoming pivotal show with the enduring, emblematic Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, NY, “Collapse: Black Wall Street Study” by Damien Davis marks the artist’s inaugural solo showing with LatchKey Gallery at UNTITLED (Miami Beach – Beach @ 12th) and a powerful investigation of materiality and conceptual rigor. The artist’s research-based practice upends conventional understandings of African-American history, revealing the narratives commonly buried under the surface. “Collapse: Black Wall Street Study” is on view for the duration of UNTITLED at Booth A7 (Dec 4-8, 2019.)

 

Above details from Damien Davis’ “Pre-Check (Blackamoors Collage #280)” Laser-cut plexiglas and stainless steel hardware, 14x10x2″

Davis’ works embrace a keen grasp of formal composition, embedding careful details into meticulously cut plexiglas shapes attached using metal fasteners. These industrial materials allude to the lexicon of labor intrinsically tied into entrenched views of African-American history, outmoded means of regarding black Americans still haunting our contemporary society. Davis draws from a pared-down color palette and specific, enduring iconography intrinsic to both the Black and Southern vernaculars – images that question where these two identities overlap, as well as their points of divergence. Davis himself speaks of discrete images – separate and distinct – that define his installations, drawing each element into conversation with an overarching whole, yet making distinct boundaries palpable for these works on view at UNTITLED – and later the Weeksville site.

LatchKey Gallery presents this new series by Damien Davis which visually investigates the murder of a minimum of three hundred black residents of Greenwood, Oklahoma in the early 1920s. As we near the hundredth anniversary of this massacre, COLLAPSE: Black Wall Street Study seeks to create new means of entering into a dialogue on the progress that has (or has not) been made with regards to civil rights, representation, visibility, and reparations for descendants of former slaves. Davis does not shy away from the tough conversations, yet invites others to respond authentically and inquisitively to his work. The artist will host an on-site activation of his work every day during the UNTITLED show hours at 4 pm exactly, while the artist will be in conversation with curators Natalya Mills and Larry Ossei-Mensah on Dec 6 at 2 pm.

Damien Davis, “Muddy (Blackamoors Collage #301″ Laser-cut plexiglas and stainless steel hardware, 12.5x10x2”

Damien Davis is a Brooklyn-based artist. Born in Crowley, LA and raised in Phoenix, AZ, Davis centers his practice in historical representations of blackness by unpacking the visual language of various cultures. The artist investigates how these societies code and decode representations of race through craft, design and digital modes of production. Davis has shown at The Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Arts and Design, and Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling among others. He has also presented solo exhibitions in Philadelphia and Seattle, as well as Reading Pennsylvania and Richmond, Virginia, and his work has been included in group exhibitions across the US as well as in Hiroshima, Japan and Florence, Italy.

 

Damien Davis, “Homegoing Letters (Blackamoors Collage #282″ Laser-cut plexiglas and stainless steel hardware, 10.5×12.5×2”

For further information, please contact Amanda Uribe or Natalie Kates at info@latchkeygallery.com.

 

The Oracle Alights: New Visions from Julia Sinelnikova at Miami’s Satellite Art Fair

Disorienting twinkling lights move through sinuous sculptural forms. Sparkling silver surfaces spin, bouncing beams of light in patterns like a disco ball.
The Oracle (AKA Julia Sinelnikova) always has new adventures in wait for visitors encountering her newest holographic sculptures, and this Dec 4-8 at Satellite Art Show Miami event will be no different. Installations and performances will supplement brand new hand-cut holographic sculptures, on view in The Oracle’s Satellite Art Show in Miami, Florida.
Julia Sinelnikova AKA the Oracle at Satellite Art Show Brooklyn

Coming off the heels of a successful presentation at Satellite Art Show in Brooklyn, NY – Sinelnikova’s installation images made the cover page of Artnet and was listed as a top NYC art event – the next phase of the artist’s sculptures will take viewers on a mystical multi-dimensional adventure. Taking cues from her existing Fairy Organ series along with her recent “Sky Shard” installation in Gilbertsville, NY, The Oracle creates new pathways of holographic art experiences for visitors to Satellite Art Show Miami, unleashing unique new experiences for those encountering Sinelnikova’s work for the first time or for the fiftieth time.

 

Julia Sinelnikova AKA the Oracle at Satellite Art Show Brooklyn
Outdoor sculpture “Sky Shard” (45ft x 15ft x 18ft) photos by Thomas Stuart Hall. On permanent view at Gilbertsville Expressive Movement NY.

The Oracle’s sculptures have been exhibited at Satellite Art Show along with upstate NY, Lazy Susan Gallery in lower Manhattan, and in Brooklyn sponsored by the NYC Parks Dept. Her work engages with the female sorceress and the feminine gaze within the framework of the cyber anime dreamscapes. Sinelnikova’s practices engages with escapist tendencies in AR/VR and her immersive contemporary art installations hold different meanings for every visitor: a place of dreams, hallucination and fulfillment.

Holographic Sculpture from The Oracle’s “Fairy Organ” series
2019 portrait of The Oracle by Yvette Tang at the artist’s studio

 

On view Dec 4-8, 2019 in Miami, FL at Satellite Art Show (2210 North Miami Court), The Oracle’s next holographic sculptures, installations and performances are a must-see for Miami-bound art lovers!

AHA Fine Art Brings Bold Forms to CONTEXT Miami

Embracing a range of artistic mediums, from sculpture and tapestry to painting and mixed media, AHA Fine Art’s Booth C8 at Miami’s CONTEXT art fair holds promise as a bright spot in the firmament of Miami Art Week. On view from Dec 3-8, 2019, CONTEXT is located in downtown Miami on Biscayne Bay and features art dealers displaying work by promising contemporary artists. AHA Fine Art will feature nine artists whose style spans a wide range of mediums and conceptual approaches, bringing together Vincent Arcilesi, Alex Callender, John Defeo, Jen Dwyer, India Evans, Rachel Grobstein, Nola Romano, Arlene Rush and Andrea von Bujdoss.

Rachel Grobstein and Jen Dwyer mine the existing visual language of sculpture ranging from vernacular to Neoclassical. Grobstein’s sculptures incorporate everyday objects at miniature scale, inviting visitors to intimately experience these presumed precious objects. Her carefully encyclopedic approach gestures toward the archival styles of Camille Henrot, among others, while maintaing a distinct aesthetic. Dwyer’s boundary-pushing artwork advances contemporary ceramics at the crossroads of ancient and modern, Orient and Occident. The artist recently completed her MFA, and has pursued various opportunities to study ceramics in China, Vermont and Upstate New York – all of which have steered and developed her work, which exudes a sophisticated yet subversive approach.

“Roadside Memorial”, Rachel Grobstein, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami
“Venus Vase”, Jen Dwyer, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami

 

Arlene Rush (featured photo) also approaches her practice with a subversive, conceptual mindset. The interdisciplinary artist dives into a treasure trove of kitsch and classical elements for her installation work, which both criticizes and soberly comments on contemporary economic and social values, inviting visitors to form their own opinions on the meanings inherent to systems which govern us.

At CONTEXT, AHA Fine Art also presents paintings by landscape and figurative artists that present something for everyone: lovers of fresh, contemporary color and classic, clean line. Alex Callender’s paintings invite wonder and dreamy speculation, embracing classical figuration and engulfing them in bright pastel shades. Her work combines beauty and critical art historical studies. John Defeo’s neo-impressionist landscapes present figures in moody environs, while the powerful scale of Vincent Arcilesi’s landscape paintings evince a technical precision carefully balanced with a harmony of line and color.

“Untitled – Yellow” Alex Callender, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami
“Trees of Charlevoix”, Vincent Arcilesi, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami
“Nightswimming”, John Defeo, on view at AHA Fine Art Booth C8 – Context Art Miami

 

Don’t miss the opportunity to experience the diverse range of artworks on view at AHA Fine Art’s C8 booth at CONTEXT Art Miami. On view December 3-8, 2019 in downtown Miami, the fair offers a view onto artists on the rise today – and AHA Fine Art presents some of the most talented rising voices on the art scene today.

Excitement Mounts for Pelham Art Center’s Studio Café on November 16, 2019

Saturday, November 16 marks an exciting day for guests to Pelham Art Center: the center’s annual Fall fundraiser, Studio Café, offers a smorgasbord of wonderful activities for attendees. From 7 pm on, Pelham Art Center (155 Fifth Ave, Pelham, NY) will play host to delightful artists, musicians, local food + drink treats and even the launch of new exhibit: “Collectibles”, featuring works priced to sell at under $2500 by artists Laurence Belotti, Capucine Bourcart, Alvin Clayton,  Bob Clyatt, Mayuko Fujino, Maizianne, RC Hagans, Eileen Karakashian, Doug Newton and Alexis Trice. Studio Café offers a chance for visitors to experience all that Pelham Art Center has to offer while supporting the center’s education and community programs. With general admission (entry from 7 pm) available for a reasonable $95 and VIP advance 6 pm entry priced at $145, your ticket to arts access is on sale now. An online auction – live now! – also offers the opportunity to secure limited editions and unique works by distinguished artists with all proceeds benefiting the Center.

Auction artwork available for purchase by artist Ann Lewis – Proceeds support Pelham Art Center

Community members come together around the meaningful art experiences offered by the Pelham Art Center for this fundraiser event, with event co-chairs Michelle Acosta and Julie Cepler leading the way! Live art demos will be helmed by notable teaching artists Donna Ross and Frank Guida, with live music by jazz musicians Dan Haedicke (DH4 Music) and vocalist Sarah Rayani. Later in the evening, DJ Lightbolt (aka renowned artist Nicky Enright) will bring guests to their feet with some fun and funky beats.

 

Artwork by notable artists such as Ruben Natal San Miguel, whose work will be featured in an upcoming exhibit at the Museum of the City of New York, is included alongside other established artists Shepard Fairey, Ann Lewis, Kate Fauvell, Katy Garry, David Kramer and more in this exclusive Fall fundraiser auction.

 

In addition to the fundraiser’s impressive auction offerings, special 1’x1′ $250 artworks specially made for the event by distinguished artists Arlene Rush, Susan Saas, Kate Fauvell, Charlotte Mouquin, Gabriel Shuldiner and more will be available exclusively to event attendees. Craft brew will be provided by Wolf + Warrior and delicious culinary treats by Caffe Regatta, Canita Lobos, Elia Taverna, Manor Market, Pelham Pizza, Rockwells, and many more. What are you waiting for?  Tickets available now for this exclusive annual event.

 

Auction artwork available for purchase by artist Christina Massey – Proceeds support Pelham Art Center

 

Word Up! A Standout Moment for Text-Based Art at C24 Gallery


In an era rampant with political protest and 
the multitudinous voices of social media, Word Up!- co-curated by Sharon Louden at C24 Gallery, knows what’s up.

Installation view featuring installation “Moral History” by Karen Finley for C24’s Word Up!

Word Up! marks an exhibition that takes risks and is rewarded with a keen grasp of contemporary self-expression. Considering a contemporary art scene saturated more than ever with sociopolitical viewpoints, the time is more than ripe for this exquisite-and timely-exhibition. Featuring works by Liana Finck, Deborah Kass, Karen Finley, Meg Hitchcock and many more, this exhibit marks fearless departure into the diverse ways in which words infiltrate and emerge in contemporary art.

Spanning interdisciplinary artistic practices, this contemporary survey show featured video, photography, installation, painting and mixed media. Karen Finley’s incisive, provocative and genuinely humorous installation, located on the exhibit’s lower level, provides a stunning focal point from which to consider the contemporary art lexicon engulfing the viewer in Word Up! Comprised of archival materials assembled as a centrepiece – a la Judy Chicago’s Dinner Table, if you will – Finley has annotated the materials she has presented to create a thought-provoking work centered around representation, identity and exclusion. Clever illustrations by renowned artist Liana Finck and the inundating, undulating works by Meg Hitchcock also prove to be standouts in this stunning exhibition. Presentation is key, and visitors are grabbed at the entrance by a video work by artist David Krippendorff, whose work also inhabits space on the lower level near Karen Finley’s installation. Hrag Vartanian  and Deborah Kass, art critic and artist and notable public artist respectively, also have work on view in this carefully curated presentation of works written expressly into the social consciousness that forms the fabric of contemporary text-based artistic practice.

“Persephone” Meg Hitchcock, installation view in “Word Up!”

Word Up! is on view at C24 gallery from 9/26-11/9/2019.

 

 

Illuminating the “Unseen”: Collar Works in Troy, NY Elevates Contemporary Artists

Artworks on view in the deceptively subtle exhibition “Unseen” bring that which is frequently overlooked directly into the public eye. In a world in which most of what directs our behavior goes unnoticed, “Unseen” marks the clever, perceptive type of exhibit that we crave to focus our attention on. Curated by the MFA Boston’s Akili Tommasino for Collar Works, artists on view include Carris Adams, Tania Alvarez, Aurora Andrews, Jose- Aurelio Baez, Raina Briggs, Ryan Chase Clow, Matt Crane, Richard Deon, Carla Dortic, Deborah Druick, Mark Eisendrath, Rebecca Flis, Gigi Gatewood, Chet Gold, Victoria van der Laan, Jesse Meredith, Sarah Pater, James Marshall Porter, Jr., Anne- Audrey Remarais, Eric Souther, Susanna Starr, Paula Stuttman, and Sarah Sweeney. Works by Mark Eisendrath and Susanna Starr  in particular sweep into focus, with a distinctive attention to line and form. Spanning sculpture and painting with a hint of lyric poetry, “Unseen” follows those elements that both direct and elude our line of sight. 

The unseen can be that which is literally unresolved: that which exists up to a point, then inhabits the realm of both the unseen and the unknown. Artist Mark Eisendrath notes of his work Mysterioso, on view in “Unseen,” “Mysterioso existed only as an idea- not seen or felt. It did not exist, neither did the process I used to make it. It was quite literally- a mystery. ” That which cannot be seen or felt can still hold a palpable presence in our lives. As the curator of “Unseen” notes in her exhibition text, “…the complex algorithms that reinforce our behavior remain hidden to us. Our fear of being unseen makes us susceptible to manipulation.” By making that which is foreign to us palpable, “Unseen” offers the viewer a clever, nuanced portrait of contemporary society.

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“Mysterioso” by artist Mark Eisendrath (acquired by a new collector) “Unseen” at Collarworks, Troy, NY

Susanna Starr and Mark Eisendrath share a penchant for uncovering the sought for-yet undiscovered- form. Curves and delineated lines trace the patterns of our subconscious seeking that which we do not yet know. A mysterious, yet visceral, presentation of new works by contemporary sculptors, painters and mixed-media artists, “Unseen” is a careful selection of artworks that transcend the ordinary in search of a greater meaning beyond the immediately visible.

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Installation view of “Unseen” feat. “Bring It” by Mark Eisendrath

“Unseen” is on view at Collar Works art space in Troy, NY, through Dec 14, 2019.

Avant-Kitchen: Art for a New Dinner Party in the Spaghetti-O Incident

Produced by The Hive, an interdisciplinary art community based in Brooklyn, NY, “The Spaghetti-O Incident” dissects cultural references from Guns n’Roses to Martha Rosler in an examination of gendered expectations and hetero-normativity. Curated by Yasmeen Abdallah, Kathie Halfin and Ameta Wegryzn, the exhibit – occurring at 1218 Prospect Ave in Oct 2019 – features a range of interdisciplinary artists including Julia Blume, Victoria Calabro, Kat Cope, Pei-Ling Ho, Sarah Dineen, Vyczie Dorado, Ariel Kleinberg, Alison Owen, Muhajir Subuur Lesure, Jean Carla Rodea, Jordan Segal and Yasmeen Abdallah. Works on view range from performance to photography, installation to sculpture. Examining the expectations placed upon women – as artists, homemakers, cooks, and human beings – “The Spagetti-O Incident” doesn’t shy away from provocative and subversive works questioning and thwarting ideas of identity and performativity.

Sculpture by Jordan M Segal for “The Spaghetti-O Incident”

Gender is digested through performance that takes place in a residence: the living space provides a non-neutral scenario for the exhibit loaded with valuable context. The white cube is denied the privilege of sterilizing these powerful works on view by Kat Cope, Pei-Ling Ho, Sarah Dineen, Yasmeen Abdallah, Jordan Segal & more. The weight of the body and gender in domestic spaces, such as the kitchen, is keenly felt in this artist-curated show. Many artists reflect on ideas of food, meals, and the domestic sphere, with dishware by Jordan Segal seemingly dissolving into itself, reminiscent of cake frosting or, more morbidly, melted skin. Kat Cope’s work similarly addresses the topic of skin: specifically, clothing as a type of armor that adheres to and protects the skin. Cope notes of her fiber-based installations that “like layers of skin, layers of fiber are resistant to tearing and puncture.” Blending together elements of fashion, protection, and performance, Kat Cope’s work lies at the boundary of  representation and installation.

Intrinsically linked with these ideas of gender and inequity are the experiences of the body as a home one inhabits. Performances by Vyczie Dorado, among others, display the full force of yearning and attachment that artists have to the corporeal. Connection, longing and expectation cradle the exhibition, with “The Spaghetti-O Incident” proving a necessary, essential exhibition for our contemporary moment. Intersectional feminism and bold experimentation combine to make this exhibit one formidable presentation in this Fall New York Art season.

Sculpture by Kat Cope left of performance by Vyczie Dorado for The Spaghetti-O Incident

 

“Noise” by Pei Ling Ho for The Spaghetti-O Incident

 

 

Artist Y.R. Egon Translates Longing Into Paintings

Y. R. Egon (Ruchira Amare) cuts a stylish, erudite figure.

Based in Brooklyn, NY, the artist arrived on the New York scene from her native Mumbai with an artistic and creative practice balancing influences from Europe and her native India. Her creative leanings are underpinned by a formidable education background in Engineering and Fashion Design. Learning under established Mumbai-based artists while concurrently pursuing a degree in Engineering from the University of Mumbai, Egon distills a wide range of influences into her impressionist, yet geometrically balanced, paintings. The artist holds a Fashion Design degree from the Parsons School of Design.

The artist sat down with ANTE. to discuss themes running through her work and what’s upcoming for her on the heels of exhibitions at Dacia Gallery, Six Summit Gallery, Rochester Contemporary Art Center and The Greenpoint Gallery.

Painter Y R Egon

ANTE.: Your work shows formal qualities linking to modernist greats such as Piet Mondrian. Do you see your practice as continuing a dialogue with modern abstract artists from the mid-20th century? 

Y.R.: I agree – yes. I have always followed Mondrian, Kazimir Malevich, Mark Rothko and Wassily Kandinsky. As Mondrian once said, “Abstract art is not the creation of another reality but the true vision of reality.” I try to have my own language and to express my emotions through my paintings.

ANTE.: Color and shape are important aspects in your paintings. How has your approach in forming connections between color and shape evolved from your studies to the present moment?

Y.R.: I have always cherished the emotion that comes out of nostalgia and longing for the past. I attempt to capture and preserve these emotions through my paintings. Over time I realized that there is a word for this behaviour in Finnish; that word is ‘kaiho,’ meaning a hopeless longing in which one feels incomplete and yearns for something unattainable or extremely difficult and tedious to attain. I use colour and shape and geometric-like patterns which are not truly geometric: these (patterns) have evolved over time and show some traces of reality.

ANTE.: Your formative education in art occurred when you were learning from painters based in India. How do you see your work forming a bridge between the Indian art canon and the Western art canon?

Y.R.: I did not have a formal art education but I studied under great and successful artists in India. I learnt many techniques from them that helped me translate and formulate my ideas using the medium of painting. I try to use my knowledge, my ideas, my inspirations and life experiences to formulate my thoughts. In the process, unintentionally I end up using different techniques and practices that span both the Indian and the Western art canon.

ANTE.: As a full-time artist, you are dedicated to painting and making art constantly; what are some of your goals in terms of exhibiting your paintings? Do you have a dream gallery you’d like to show with and/or museum or similar venue to show your work?

Y.R.: Being an ambitious artist, my goal is to better my art practice and art technique, evolve as a person through enriched life experience and to then translate that into my art and paintings. I fell in love with Gallery Perrotin the first time I went there to check out a show. The space is beautiful and dreamy. My artworks have a lot of colour but come out of the concept of dreams and it would be a dream to be able to exhibit at this space.

Lost Journey, Y.R. Egon Gouache on paper, 16″ x 20″, 2019

ANTE.: You are a poet and have trained as an engineer, alongside your work as an artist and fashion designer. How do you unite all of these disparate elements in your painting? Has it shaped how you approach art-making?

Y.R.: Yes, I studied Engineering and graduated from the University of Mumbai. I write poems but only to express my ideas through another medium. I studied Fashion Design from Parsons School of Design. I am in process of launching some garments/apparel that are inspired from my paintings from the ‘kaiho’ collection. Hence, I feel that even though they all are separate fields, it all boils down to an expression of ideas as they come together in a product or in works of art. I try to carry the same romantic feeling and emotion in all my works including my fashion illustrations. I specifically use watercolours for these, and in my next series of paintings, I plan to experiment more with watercolour in order to capture the haziness of the lost memories.

ANTE.: How has working in fashion impacted your work as a painter? Do you work with a variety of materials as a result? 

Y.R.: As a fashion designer, I stand by the principles of creative construction and sustainability. I use only natural fabrics and natural dyeing on them. I also use fabric as a medium to paint and specifically natural dyed fabric which is dyed with the colours made from plants such as logwood, madder and flowers such as marigold and berries as well. I also plan to make my own natural pigments from these plants and flowers and natural materials to paint on stretched fabrics such as cotton and silk.

ANTE.: More specifically, does your work as a painter shift in scale due to your background in the fashion industry?

Y.R.: I actually am not that experimental or easily accepting to change. Hence, I try to usually paint in a certain style and on a certain size as well. But again, the scale changes a bit when it is translated on apparel or fabric paintings.

Colorful Houses, Y.R. Egon Gouache on paper, 16″ x 20″, 2019

ANTE.: You’re now based in Brooklyn, NY, and have exhibited with The Greenpoint Gallery and Dacia Gallery. How does living in NYC impact your practice as an artist?

Y.R.: NYC is very dynamic and inspirational, Brooklyn specifically is the epicentre for the modern, contemporary and experimental art that is not commercial. I recently exhibited at the ‘Space 776’ as a part of their Bushwick open studios which was covered by Hyperallergic magazine! I find Brooklyn as a very important factor of my stay in the city and is very inspirational and also motivational to see and meet other artists and their work. I have exhibited at various galleries in Manhattan and Brooklyn and that serves as a booster for myself and my art practice.