Dorit Chrysler & Her Theremins Take Over at Reece School

The Reece School in Upper Manhattan (courtesy Reece School)
The Reece School in Upper Manhattan (courtesy Reece School)

Internationally renowned musical artist Dorit Chrysler is no stranger to making a theremin sing. Theremins, the odd yet aptly tech-friendly device that can be manipulated by movements carefully choreographed around the device (see here a basic guide to handling the theremin), may have existed for ninety years already but that is relatively young in terms of the musical instrument invention timeline (for reference, both the guitar and piano had been in existence for hundreds years before the theremin was patented in 1928 by Leon Theremin.) This relative “youth” and the innovation which inspires players to interact with it allow ample breadth for consistently new discoveries. Austrian-born Chrysler is doing just that, pioneering contemporary theremin playing styles alongside a string of appearances with the likes of The Strokes, Dinosaur Jr., Blonde Redhead, and others. On Thursday, March 26th, Chrysler is staging a private performance alongside her newest international performing troupe: students at the Reece School. 

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Moog Theremini – courtesy Moog Music

Hosted at the educational facility’s Black Box theater, the invite-only event features a series of songs that the students have been trained to perform, along with Chrysler. Generous support by Moog music has allowed this performance, the first in a series of such performances, to take place at the school. The group is styled as Kid Cool Theremin School, and promises to shake things up through this guided, interactive music experience for the school’s students. Reece school’s students, who attend at no cost as the institution is a nonprofit special needs school, are thrilled to take part in the first US-based theremin school for kids. Led by Chrysler, and spearheaded by Reece School music director William Tucci, the Kid Cool Theremin School is only just getting started and will have a lot to offer thanks to its innovative vision and direction.

Triumphant LiC-A Artists Exhibition Opens at Atlantic Gallery Feb 1st

LIC-A@Atlantic Gallery

548 West 28th St., Suite 540, NY, NY 10001
Opening reception: Thursday, Feb 1, 6:00-8:30 pm
Exhibition on view Jan 30th-Feb 17th

The talented artists of Long Island City will all be together under one roof for LIC-A@Atlantic Gallery, hosted from 1/30-2/17 at 548 West 28th St #540 in Chelsea. Carol Crawford, fellow artist & president of the board at LICA, shares one of her annual curating spots with her fellow members at LICA, making this the 4th annual LiC-A@Atlantic exhibition.

LIC-A@ATLANTIC exhibition announcement

A veritable who’s who of artists who live or work in Long Island City, there will be artworks on view by Lia Ali, Diane Bassin, Mindy Bassin, J.F. Bautista, Patricia Brintle, Patricia Bouley, Nicholas Christopher, Anne Closuit Eisenheart, Carol Crawford, Fabienne Cuter, Joseph August De Leo, Kathy Ferguson, Jean Foos, Diana Freedman-Shea, Eric Friedmann, Estsud “cappy” Fungcap, Gilly Gil-Lugo, Michelle Goguen, Asano Agarie Gomez, Raul Gracia, Myrna Harrison-Changar, Erika Horwitz, Afzal Hossain, Glenn Marlowe, Nancy Macina, Thaddeaus Radell, Sarah Richardson, Carol Rickey, Mark Rossi, Theo Sahos, Min-Myng Jung Schaffner, Veronica Soto-Hlampeas, Howard Stevens, Carrie Swim, Therese Tan, Diane Teeter, Kay Towns, Preston Trombly, Marji Wollin and Siu Wong-Camac. With a total of forty exhibiting artists, the exhibition will span the remarkable breadth of artistic styles rooted in Long Island City.

 

With styles ranging from figurative to abstract, and a variety of artistic practices on offer, LIC-A@Atlantic will hold something for everyone. Come out and support working artists who comprise the artist community of Long Island City in this rare exhibition, catapulting artists who work outside of the scene of usual suspects in Manhattan and Bushwick. Home to formidable international artists Kimsooja and Mark di Suvero, Long Island City’s tribe of contemporary artists explore form and content in unique and surprising ways.

Siu Camac-Wong, “City in Ruins” (2017)

Don’t miss the opening of LIC-A@Atlantic from 6-8 pm on Thursday, Feb 1, and stay tuned for meet the artist nights (6-8 pm, Thurs, Feb. 8 & Thurs, Feb. 15 and Sat, Feb. 17 2-5 pm)

Carol Crawford, “The Staircase” (2014)

-1 Below: A Look at Culture in the Outer Boros & NY Metro Area, Jan 29 to Feb 2, 2018

There are countless gallery guides exploring the cultural events happening throughout NYC, but how many can you find within walking distance or bus ride of your nest? How many events happen right down the street that you could swing by after a nice dinner with a friend? Why does every single blog profile seem to profile events happening in the art areas of Chelsea and the Lower East Side?

With these thoughts in mind, here at -1 Below we take a look at cultural events happening around New York City, minus one boro: Manhattan.

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Below we consider upcoming cultural highlights with five not-to-miss events from Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island and the Bronx… with some cultural events to entice guests willing to venture farther afield.

Artwork by Katherine Toukhy, PES Grab back artist-in-residence
Artwork by Katherine Toukhy, PES Grab back artist-in-residence (Project for Empty Space, Newark, NJ)
  1. “Night Regulation” Radiator Gallery, 10-61 Jackson Ave, Long Island City feat. artists Loren Britton, Maria Dimanshtein, Nicholas Fraser, JF Lynch and Andrew Prayzner – curated by Patrick Neal. An exhibition touching on the fraught and complex relationship between conceptual and formal elements present in contemporary art. Opening: Feb 2nd from 6-9 pm  
  2. “Incision: Feminist in Residence” Project for Empty Space, 2 Gateway Center, Newark, NJ  (across from Penn station skybridge) feat. artists Chaya Babu, Christen Clifford, Camille Lee and Katherine Toukhy. Profoundly feminist, this exhibition explores the personal and political presence of being a woman artist in a complex, hierarchical art world pantheon.  Opening: Jan 31st from 6-8 pm.
  3. Know Your Mushrooms: Mycology 101” Earth Arts Center, 936 Madison Street, Brooklyn, NY for artists with a taste for the wilder side of nature, this class, led by expert agriculturalist and PDC practitioner Oliver Bolotin, covers key points outlined by Paul Stamets in the tome “Mycelium Running”. This class will cover wild mushrooms as well as growing your own fungi colony at home. Event takes place Sat, Feb 3rd: doors open at 8 pm with discussion beginning at 8:30. 
  4. “Reenactment” gallery talk, BRIC (The Stoop @ BRIC Arts) 647 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, NY. Coffee + Conversation discussing current BRIC exhibition “Reenactment” with curator Jenny Gerow and exhibiting artists Maria Hupfield and Farideh Sakhaeifer on how certain histories are privileged, stifled, and/or eventually re-examined. The exhibition features artworks by Ken Gonzalez-Day, Crystal Z. Campbell, Alicia Grullon (pictured in cover image), Hupfield, Sakhaeifer, and Marisa Williamson. Feb 3rd from 12-1 pm.  
  5. “Coming to America” Free Screening @Brooklyn Bazaar, 150 Greenpoint Ave, Brooklyn, NY. A light-hearted look at America (specifically, Jamaica Queens) through the eyes of a visitor from our current administration’s so-monikered “shithole countries”, come laugh off our current xenophobia with Eddie Murphy and Arsenio Hall’s devastatingly witty performance, with turns by the commanding James Earl Jones and Madge Sinclair in the classic 1988 film directed by John Landis.  No RSVP required, seating first come first serve. Jan 31st from 8-11 pm. 
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“Know Your Mushrooms: Mycology 101” Earth Arts Center

In Time/Out of Place a Transcendent Exhibition for Asian Society of Arts

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At Parasol Projects through Sunday November 26th, the Asian Society of Arts presents the group exhibition “In time/Out of Place,” curated by Katya Grokhovsky.

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Making manifest the latent struggle existing between our temporary human existence and the longevity of place, the exhibition investigates aspects of identity and geography.

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The Asian Society of the Arts, which advocates for and provides opportunities to artists from overseas relocating to the United States, here features works by artists Munjer Hashim, Jian Yi, Maiko Kikuchi, Harshad Marathe, Kohei Urakami, Jerri WeiXiaoye Xing, and curator Grokhovsky who hails from Australia.

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Utilizing video, animation, prints, digital art, illustrations and architectural stylings, “In time/Out of Place” takes new media and contemporary topics to new levels in an urgent and coherent exhibition.

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Programming includes a lecture on Saturday, 11/25 at 4 pm and a closing event on Sunday, 11/26 from 6-8 pm. Exhibition hours last from 12-6 pm until the closing party on Sunday, 11/26. Saturday’s lecture focuses on the Digital Age of the Art Market and will be led by Ms. Yixin Wang, and the closing celebration features a violin performance by Anna Tsukervanik and live action by Katya Grokhovsky (7 pm).

Shockwaves: SVA Summit Considers Combatting Nationalism in Contemporary Curating

In an era of rising nationalism and public displays of fascism in America, how can the arts unite as a cohesive front to defend its most vulnerable citizens? In a field known for its open approach to free speech topics, how can leaders in the visual arts – museum directors, curators, artists and others – face up to the mounting threats of ultraconservatism and “fake news” as they relate to everyday citizens? What about mounting threats to de-fund and otherwise censor the arts? The School of Visual Arts’ Master’s Program in Curatorial Practice has produced a full day of programming centered around how leaders in the visual arts are working to combat these forces threatening our freedoms. The day-long summit, Curatorial Activism and the Politics of Shock, will take place on Saturday, November 18 from 10 AM – 5 PM. It features a carefully curated cohort of formative curators and arts leaders who will engage in conversation and present topics related to the needs of art leaders to stand up for a free society.

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Leaders engaged in the discussion include Tensta Konsthall Director Maria Lind, Kunsthalle Basel director Elena Filipovic, Director of La Panacée Nicolas Bourriaud, Serpentine Galleries Artistic Director Hans Ulrich Obrist, and many more. The event is formatted as a series of eight minute presentations by clusters of art world thought leaders interspersed with question and answer rounds occur in roughly 90 minute cycles.

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The event is currently at capacity; however, the entire event will be livestreamed  in its entirety on the MA Curatorial Practice YouTube channel. To learn more about how we can improve cultural initiatives to support a free society, tune in and join the conversation!

Ai Wei Wei’s Public Art Fund sponsored “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors” Breaks Down Barriers

October 10, 2017

 

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Ai Wei Wei and Nicholas Baume at Doris C Freedman Plaza for Good Fences Make Good Neighbors (press preview)

It was 9:07 AM, and the artist was discreetly standing to the right of his Gilded Cage sculpture in Doris C. Freedman plaza in Central Park. Ai Wei Wei, artist behind Good Fences Make Good Neighbors  – an immersive public art experience around NYC’s Five Boros – was standing next to the Central Park behemoth which was realized with the support of the Public Art Fund. The Fund is currently celebrating 40 years, with Wei Wei’s project as their central focus celebrating this momentous milestone.  Wei Wei was deep in conversation with a city official when the photographers swarmed him, creating a buzz of activity near a path of curious dog walkers and joggers.

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Wei Wei can similarly expect that his art installations, situated throughout New York City Parks including Central Park, Washington Square Park, and the Unisphere at Corona, Queens, will be swarmed by visitors during its duration from October 12, 2017 through February 11, 2018. Each site-specific work responds to the surrounding architecture, echoing themes of immigration and inclusivity. Wei Wei has planned discreet references to the personal faces of immigration and global migration visible on lampposts throughout the City – including near the Gilded Cage work – featuring documentary portraiture from Wei Wei’s visits to over forty refugee camps in twenty-three countries. Additionally, graphics echoing themes related to the refugee crisis will be installed at bus stations and public sites throughout the City.

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Wei Wei himself was kept under home arrest for years in his native China after a stint living as an artist for twelve years on New York City’s Lower East Side, and this return to NYC is a triumphal return for him as well as a personal tribute to the residents of the City. After recovering his passport in 2015, the artist relocated his studio to Berlin and resumed talks with Public Art Fund’s Nicholas Baume that began in 2011 on a large-scale public art project based in New York City. Baume notes that the various iterations of Ai Wei Wei’s Good Fences Make Good Neighbors “form different articulations of fences as a motif resonating throughout the City.” By meditating on the different ways we can experience and exercise inclusion within our communities, Wei Wei breaks down perceptions concerning who belongs where, facilitating new environments where people can relate to one another on a personal level.

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Ai Wei Wei’s “Arch” in Washington Square Park, New York City 

Wei Wei himself noted of the project, “We are living in a divided time; I’ve learned so much from [my time in] this City: here, you never feel like you’re a foreigner.” He notes that this feeling of inclusion is crucial to New York City as a global beacon of hope for those who call this city home. By supporting our diverse ecosystem of international communities throughout the five boros, we can better reflect on how to be a good neighbor to those who call on us in a time of need and break apart the stereotypes that stand between us.

 

-ANTE.’s Editors