In Time/Out of Place a Transcendent Exhibition for Asian Society of Arts

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At Parasol Projects through Sunday November 26th, the Asian Society of Arts presents the group exhibition “In time/Out of Place,” curated by Katya Grokhovsky.

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Making manifest the latent struggle existing between our temporary human existence and the longevity of place, the exhibition investigates aspects of identity and geography.

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The Asian Society of the Arts, which advocates for and provides opportunities to artists from overseas relocating to the United States, here features works by artists Munjer Hashim, Jian Yi, Maiko Kikuchi, Harshad Marathe, Kohei Urakami, Jerri WeiXiaoye Xing, and curator Grokhovsky who hails from Australia.

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Utilizing video, animation, prints, digital art, illustrations and architectural stylings, “In time/Out of Place” takes new media and contemporary topics to new levels in an urgent and coherent exhibition.

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Programming includes a lecture on Saturday, 11/25 at 4 pm and a closing event on Sunday, 11/26 from 6-8 pm. Exhibition hours last from 12-6 pm until the closing party on Sunday, 11/26. Saturday’s lecture focuses on the Digital Age of the Art Market and will be led by Ms. Yixin Wang, and the closing celebration features a violin performance by Anna Tsukervanik and live action by Katya Grokhovsky (7 pm).

Shockwaves: SVA Summit Considers Combatting Nationalism in Contemporary Curating

In an era of rising nationalism and public displays of fascism in America, how can the arts unite as a cohesive front to defend its most vulnerable citizens? In a field known for its open approach to free speech topics, how can leaders in the visual arts – museum directors, curators, artists and others – face up to the mounting threats of ultraconservatism and “fake news” as they relate to everyday citizens? What about mounting threats to de-fund and otherwise censor the arts? The School of Visual Arts’ Master’s Program in Curatorial Practice has produced a full day of programming centered around how leaders in the visual arts are working to combat these forces threatening our freedoms. The day-long summit, Curatorial Activism and the Politics of Shock, will take place on Saturday, November 18 from 10 AM – 5 PM. It features a carefully curated cohort of formative curators and arts leaders who will engage in conversation and present topics related to the needs of art leaders to stand up for a free society.

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Leaders engaged in the discussion include Tensta Konsthall Director Maria Lind, Kunsthalle Basel director Elena Filipovic, Director of La Panacée Nicolas Bourriaud, Serpentine Galleries Artistic Director Hans Ulrich Obrist, and many more. The event is formatted as a series of eight minute presentations by clusters of art world thought leaders interspersed with question and answer rounds occur in roughly 90 minute cycles.

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The event is currently at capacity; however, the entire event will be livestreamed  in its entirety on the MA Curatorial Practice YouTube channel. To learn more about how we can improve cultural initiatives to support a free society, tune in and join the conversation!

Ai Wei Wei’s Public Art Fund sponsored “Good Fences Make Good Neighbors” Breaks Down Barriers

October 10, 2017

 

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Ai Wei Wei and Nicholas Baume at Doris C Freedman Plaza for Good Fences Make Good Neighbors (press preview)

It was 9:07 AM, and the artist was discreetly standing to the right of his Gilded Cage sculpture in Doris C. Freedman plaza in Central Park. Ai Wei Wei, artist behind Good Fences Make Good Neighbors  – an immersive public art experience around NYC’s Five Boros – was standing next to the Central Park behemoth which was realized with the support of the Public Art Fund. The Fund is currently celebrating 40 years, with Wei Wei’s project as their central focus celebrating this momentous milestone.  Wei Wei was deep in conversation with a city official when the photographers swarmed him, creating a buzz of activity near a path of curious dog walkers and joggers.

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Wei Wei can similarly expect that his art installations, situated throughout New York City Parks including Central Park, Washington Square Park, and the Unisphere at Corona, Queens, will be swarmed by visitors during its duration from October 12, 2017 through February 11, 2018. Each site-specific work responds to the surrounding architecture, echoing themes of immigration and inclusivity. Wei Wei has planned discreet references to the personal faces of immigration and global migration visible on lampposts throughout the City – including near the Gilded Cage work – featuring documentary portraiture from Wei Wei’s visits to over forty refugee camps in twenty-three countries. Additionally, graphics echoing themes related to the refugee crisis will be installed at bus stations and public sites throughout the City.

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Wei Wei himself was kept under home arrest for years in his native China after a stint living as an artist for twelve years on New York City’s Lower East Side, and this return to NYC is a triumphal return for him as well as a personal tribute to the residents of the City. After recovering his passport in 2015, the artist relocated his studio to Berlin and resumed talks with Public Art Fund’s Nicholas Baume that began in 2011 on a large-scale public art project based in New York City. Baume notes that the various iterations of Ai Wei Wei’s Good Fences Make Good Neighbors “form different articulations of fences as a motif resonating throughout the City.” By meditating on the different ways we can experience and exercise inclusion within our communities, Wei Wei breaks down perceptions concerning who belongs where, facilitating new environments where people can relate to one another on a personal level.

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Ai Wei Wei’s “Arch” in Washington Square Park, New York City 

Wei Wei himself noted of the project, “We are living in a divided time; I’ve learned so much from [my time in] this City: here, you never feel like you’re a foreigner.” He notes that this feeling of inclusion is crucial to New York City as a global beacon of hope for those who call this city home. By supporting our diverse ecosystem of international communities throughout the five boros, we can better reflect on how to be a good neighbor to those who call on us in a time of need and break apart the stereotypes that stand between us.

 

-ANTE.’s Editors