Independent New York Presents a Refreshing Contemporary Wunderkammer

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Company gallery at Independent NY (feat.works by Barbara Hammer, Troy Michie and more) image courtesy Independent NY

As usual, a visit to Independent Art Fair in New York doesn’t disappoint. On view this weekend at Spring Studios (50 Varick Street) in Lower Manhattan from 12-7 Sat 3/7 and 12-6 Sunday 3/8, this carefully curated fair is presented with minimal spectacle and maximum impact. Eschewing an the aesthetic of the uncontained, Independent N.Y. allows space for fair goers to step back and digest the diverse palettes presented by exhibitors.

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Installation detail by Cannupa Hanska Luger for Garth Greenan gallery, image courtesy Independent NY
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Pablo Tomek on view at Galerie Christophe Gaillard

Cannupa Hanksa Luger continues to push the envelope forward with human rights and indigenous visibility with a presentation at Garth Greenan gallery, while Company gallery stuns with a simultaneously personal yet abstracted group presentation. The insurmountable genius of Wolfgang Tillmans emerges at the Maureen Paley gallery presentation. Exhibitors have exhibited the ability to pull inspiration from multiple sources, sensorially and intellectually, without muddying the waters beyond comprehension.

Installation remains a key part of Independent presenters’ motive, with multiple perspectives available for visitors to access. Where the creeping influence of design and interdisciplinary approaches meets a surge in identity politics, the breath of fresh contemporary wonder that is Independent lies at the ready to strike into the heart of visitors’ imaginations.

A wealth of mediums and conceptual rigor greet the fair visitor. Make sure not to miss the chance to step into the refreshing space inhabited by Independent NY in 2020 before it closes this Sunday.

HEAL Exhibition Mines the Anthropocene, Unites Artists Toward a Greater Cause

Armory week in New York City is not for the faint of heart. What can better salve the art fair weary soul than finding a conceptually rigorous, yet relaxing, presentation of contemporary art? Enter HEAL : an art exhibition on view at Jadite galleries (413 W 50th street) from March 4-8 that brings together like-minded artists seeking an oasis from the market-driven art fair approach. The stated aim of the show, hosting a March 5th opening reception from 6-8:30 pm and featuring Ayako Bando, Vicky Barranguet, Bob Clyatt, Jacki Davis, Paul T. Davis, Danni Huang, Caroline Minchew, Robin Tedesco and Kim Zack, is to “portray…the relationship of (hu)man(kind) to nature in its current state of pivotal transition…artists in HEAL act to bolster our role in creating …a healthier ecosystem.” 

 

Kim Zack, “Nest” Mixed Medaia – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

 

Vicky Barranguet, “Love by the Yard” – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

In the spirit of harmony and ecology, Davis anchors the concept for HEAL in the scientific premise of emergence: “Emergence is a phenomenon in which groups display a seemingly intrinsic unity and harmony,” reflect Davis. “According to systems scientist Peter Corning, the qualities of emergence are as follows: (1) radical novelty (features not previously observed in systems); (2) coherence or correlation (meaning integrated wholes that maintain themselves over some period of time); (3) A global or macro “level” (i.e. there is some property of “wholeness”); (4) it is the product of a dynamical process (it evolves); and (5) it is “ostensive” (it can be perceived).” By perceiving and parsing out the manner in which emergence defines our everyday lives in the anthropocene era, HEAL bridges the gap between scientific theory and community well-being.

Bob Clyatt, “Rocks in Screen Study #4” – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

Bolstered by the support of The Art Therapy Project, HEAL seeks out ways to connect on a meaningful level and to step away from art as a commodity in order to embrace it as a conduit for meditation and self-restoration. Featuring artworks ranging from painting and new media to sculpture, mixed media and collage, HEAL metes out a conduit for self-expression that empowers and envisions a better future. Curator and artist Jacki Davis notes of the impetus to display and to create the artwork on view on HEAL that when … “we tune in and respect our environment and ourselves, the beauty of connectedness naturally unfolds in present time.” Centered in light, love, and mutual appreciation, Davis’ practice seeks out mindfulness and universality. 

Ayako Bando, “Eternal Light Towanohikati”- participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

Some artists discover pathways to healing in their practice – artist Robin Tedesco notes that healing “begins when (I) enter the studio,” while other participating artists seek more spiritual approaches to find opportunities to heal. Vicky Barranguet also reveals that her own process engages with…”being creative in some way to make an impact through my daily practice and everyday life.” Artist Bob Clyatt notes that his practice dwells in the idea of healing … “via Samsara – the state of brokenness and discord – as a way of discerning paths toward what is missing.” Caroline Minchew seeks harmony in landscapes by using it as … “an intuitive guide to understand and articulate personal and collective stories.” 

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Robin Tedesco, “Blue-Green Wave III” Oil on Panel – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

Meanwhile, the long shadow cast by nature remains firmly embedded in HEALs premise. Artist Ayako Bando reflects on the natural world as a space she mediates with her artistic practice. Artist Kim Zack’s approach embraces… “an interesting and positive message regarding natural preservation for future generations.” Meanwhile, Ayako Bando’s work features an approach to healing that… “embraces light and shadow, as she believes by seeking out eternal light we can find the source of our connection to the world at a higher level.” Where Bando seeks new narratives in light, Danni Huang works to tell ….  “compelling stories, as well as building engaging worlds that lie at the boundary of art and tech.”

Caroline Minchew, “Pond 2” – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

While it becomes clear viewing the exhibit that each participating artist reaches inner peace in different ways, what is certain is that visitors will have the ability to reconsider and reconnect with a sense of being part of the natural world. Whether discerned by means of scientific inquiry or intuited through personal observations or nature and spiritual beliefs, artists in HEAL investigate aspects of harmony and fulfillment in the works on view in this exhibition.

Danni Huang, A Long Instant #2, 2015. Detail from a Single-channel video installation (color) ©Danni Huang, courtesy of the artist and the Jadite Galleries – participating artist, HEAL

HEAL is on view at the Jadite Galleries (413 W 50th street) from March 4-8 2020. The exhibition’s opening reception takes place from 6-8:30 pm on March 5th while an artist presentation is slated for Saturday, March 7th from 4:30 pm. For more information please contact jacquelinescheeldavis@gmail.com 

I See You: TAFA + Tomo Mori At Home in ChaShama’s 64th Street Location

by Mariel Tepper

 

A nine-year friendship between Ghanaian-native artist TAFA and Japanese-native artist Tomo Mori forms the heart of I See You, now on view at ChaShama’s 340 E. 64th space until March 8th. As Mori notes, “I feel Tafa and I share a deeply human connection. He knows my work since I stared showing in 2011, when I didn’t know anything or anybody in the art community. I always admired his work and I am extremely honored to do this project together.”

 

“We Got You” Tomo Mori. Woven ropes made with discard T-shirts, on view in I See You

Tomo Mori’s fluid, organic fiber art sculptures are comprised of handmade ropes made from discarded and upcycled fabrics given to her by family and friends. Shown alongside  these works are TAFA’s figurative oil paintings are informed by Ghana’s sporting events, public demonstrations and musical performances. Representing the rich diversity and international voices within the New York City arts scene, TAFA and Tomo Mori draw upon distinct imagery and materials imbued with symbolic, cultural and personal meaning, as well as their shared experience as first-generation immigrants: while both of their practices focus on their homeland, they equally embrace their new role as artists residing within the United States.

Personal history and intimate familial connections through material are tenderly woven throughout Tomo Mori’s work. Ropes of discarded baby blankets join together in the artwork Eve to form a loose, heart-like or cradle-like formation, evoking the tender embrace of a mother and newborn child. The prompt, “What do you build when you are given power?” accompanies an all-ages interactive installation of fabric-covered blocks, using social consciousness and inclusivity to shift our cultural narratives about power from division to empowerment. Sanctuary, a dazzling, optically exhilarating patchwork of fabrics, incorporates a vintage kimono, highlighting the comfort, beauty and solace Mori finds within Japanese culture.

“Eve” Tomo Mori. Ropes made with discard fabrics, wire – artwork for I See You

Alongside Tomo Mori’s materiality and indirect allusions to place and cultural symbolism, TAFA’s work keeps an eye towards the ephemeral struggles and achievements that mark the human condition. Each painting appears to be in flux, undergoing a state of change, conveyed by thick, rapid brush marks across the surface and expressive, gestural figures with contorted faces in intensely physical acts. From huddled masses gathered around a football stadium to masses in silent protest, the imagery within these artworks underscores the importance of shared social traditions to unify our collective culture in moments of crisis and uncertainty. Where Mori’s works connects in physical space, TAFA’s work unite the excitement of crowds at sporting events in a shared, communal energy. His exuberant painting style captures the enthusiasm and shared sentiments among large crowds. His work shows us an artistic expression of unity. 

“March, Placard and a Song” TAFA. Oil on canvas – artwork for I See You

TAFA and Tomo Mori both approach their work with deep-rooted and complex associations on topics of heritage, history and social structures, stemming from their own experiences as immigrants in America looking back towards the culture of their homeland. I See You encourages active observation, prompting viewers to look closer at their own surroundings and form deeper connections between place and identity. 

Supported by ChaShama, the exhibition fulfills ChaShama’s promise to give artists space to present their work while fostering community development through the arts. More information on ChaShama can be found on their website. 

The following programs will continue through the exhibition until it closes on March 8th:

Artist Talk: Tuesday, February 25, 6:30 to 8:30pm

Closing Reception, Saturday, March 7, 4 to 6pm

SAT 2/22   Fabric collage workshop by Tomo Mori 2-4pm, all-ages, children with caregiver. RSVP: tomotion@gmail.com

SAT 2/29   Rope making workshop by Tomo Mori 2-4pm, all-ages, children with caregiver. RSVP: tomotion@gmail.com

SUN 3/1    Kora/Djembe Performance by West African musician, Sunday, March 1, 2-4pm

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All events are free and open to the public. Location: Chashama Space to Present at 340 E 64th St. New York, New York 10065 (ground floor)

​Regular Gallery Hours: Friday, Saturday, Sunday 11:30am to 6:30pm
Please see the exhibition website in orde to schedule an appointment to visitoutside of these hours:  https://www.tomomoriart.com/i-see-you

Memory and Myth in Brian Whiteley’s “I Know What You Did Last Summer: a Mid-Career Retrospective”

by Mark Eisendrath

 

Putin’s steely stare gazes over Trump’s legacy in this mid-career retrospective from artist Brian Andrew Whiteley: yet, the focus tends inward. Whiteley’s discursive mid-career retrospective traces the twin psychological pathways of nostalgia and mythology that chart our paths ahead in life. Clown fetish and a reference to the artist’s childhood home sit alongside the artist’s more explosive political commentary, allowing visitors to examine what forms their basis of their respective worldviews.

Installation views,”I Know What You Did Last Summer” mid-career retrospective for Brian Andrew Whiteley

This nostalgia is noted by Jennifer Rizzo, Director at Hashimoto Contemporary, who observes that “the exhibition will be presented in a wood paneled installation, reminiscent of the suburban basement in Whiteley’s parents home, where he spent a majority of his formative years.” The exhibition does mark the artist’s shift toward anti-fascism and questioning patriotism in its dual presentation  of different perspectives on Putin and Trump: on view, of course, is the artist’s vital Trump tombstone speculating on what legacy the President will leave to the world: a modern-day memento mori, expeditiously 3D printed.


Taken in relation with the artist’s former work with clowns and clowning, the Trump-Putin relationship is framed within an extended metaphor that is both rewarding and serendipitous. Visitors are invited to sit and observe the exhibition in casual lounge-style chairs again referring back to the artist’s childhood, remarking on a wide timeline and an even wilder career trajectory. The artist has explored performance art, installation and painting along with provocative public demonstrations and the founding of Satellite Art Fair: a democratic and accessible space for experimentation.

Installation view, “I Know What You Did Last Summer” mid-career retrospective for Brian Andrew Whiteley

 

Don’t miss your final opportunity to experience Whiteley’s stunning revelations in this cleverly curated retrospective, closing Feb 1, 2020.

Film Producer Federico Guarascio on Changing the Game in Contemporary Filmmaking

Federico Guarascio is a talented producer of short films and documentaries, whose film “The Fourth Kingdom” stopped us in our tracks. A haunting survey of the communities comprised by various recycling scavengers, diving into the worlds they inhabit and how their lives intersect, the film won the top prize at the Brooklyn Film Festival. This insured it would be sent on for consideration at the upcoming Academy Awards ceremony.

Guarascio’s dedication to the film directly impacted its success, as with his work on previous films such as 2014 Sundance selection, “Godka Cirka”, and the ambitious, imaginative “Only Solomon Lee.” We were entranced by the blend of projects Guarascio selects to work on, and his superior track record as a film producer, so we sat down for a taste of his process and for an insider’s perspective on working on the cutting-edge of contemporary film.

ANTE Mag – Federico, thanks for taking time to speak with us. It’s so exciting to see “The Fourth Kingdom” win the Brooklyn Film Festival! That must have felt amazing. Can you tell us some of the rewards and a few challenges of working on this most recent award-winning film you produced?

Federico Guarascio: “The Fourth Kingdom” portrays the lives of the inhabitants of ‘Sure We Can”, a recycling center where society’s outcasts can redeem cans for money.

A documentary of this kind deals with delicate issues, and it was therefore necessary to approach the characters and the reality of these lives, investigating the characters with sensitivity. It is very rewarding to see that from this contemplative and observational approach, these characters just open up: revealing their stories and their lives. Our goal was to capture that poetic, emotional, and cinematic essence of this special place and its inhabitants. In that sense I can say that we are very proud of it.

By filming some video pieces to show all the great work that ‘Sure We Can’ is doing and their impact in so many peoples’ lives, we started to get more curious about this special place, our ‘Fourth Kingdom.’ We spent so many hours there that we became invisible to the people working there. At this point, we felt we were able to create a documentary film in the way we like to tell stories so we put together the short film while we keep working on the feature. The response has been awesome.

AM – It’s such an exciting film that sheds light on these important subjects, tackling a range of delicate issues as you mention – such as homelessness, poverty and immigration. As a documentary, the film portrays an incredible cast of real-life characters in their familiar environments. There are so many topics being discussed, can you walk us through how editing played a role in this film to portray such a wide range of people involved in the recycling community?

FG – We intended to show the human part of our subjects, not their misfortunes or their misery. We were interested in delving into the emotional side  and learning about their dreams and goals.

Another rule we applied to our concept was not to leave the space while filming. We didn’t want to see these can collectors out on the street, but in their daily life inside this ‘Fourth Kingdom.’

With this film, we also wanted to address another point of view engaging with what we can call progress on our modern society. Plastics have forever changed our lives and our world. Waste, pollution, and recycling are new realities, and this kingdom portrays side effects of that evolution: the other side of the dream of progress.

Editing as always in documentaries is one of the most crucial parts. It’s not just about delivering a sequence of scenes already decided at the start: rather, it concerns creating a singular language and defining poetic choices. As a producer,  I had the honor of supervising post production and therefore helped to define the final form of the film.

AM – This is not your first time working with Alex Lora. You also served as producer on the films “Godka Cirka” and “Only Solomon Lee”: the former was a Sundance selection which also showed at the Brooklyn Film Festival. Are there common themes or similarities in how you encountered the subject of each film? Did your role evolve from these first two films with Lora to your work as a producer on “The Fourth Kingdom?”

FG – Totally, my personal path is defined by thematic recurrences that have evolved over the years in a manner consistent with my dual professional and human growth. And I must say that I was lucky to have ever found such a prolific partner as Alex, with whom I share most of the thematic and moral choices – this underlies the work we have done together.

AM – “Godka Cirka” centered around the daily life of Alfa, a young woman based in windswept Somaliland. What were some of the challenges working on this set in a foreign country miles from home? What were some of the rewards for working on this project?

FG – “Godka Circa” is definitely one of the biggest challenges I have faced in my career.

It started with many logistical and financial difficulties and ended with a work of high poetic and human value which I am immensely proud of.

Certainly filming in Somaliland was another great challenge from a production point of view, because the permits were difficult to find and because of the topic we addressed. The women in the film live in a country where women’s rights are almost nonexistent; therefore, we had political impediments from the local government. But in the end we brought home an excellent result.

AM – So many of your films have seen success on the festival circuit, from “Godka Cirka” to “The Fourth Kingdom”. Have you found some plan for success that you follow? Do you have tips for other film producers seeking similar success?

FG – I like to define myself as man with his feet resting firmly on the clouds. Meaning that I can work only on projects that I really like and I consider appropriate to my spirit: projects that sync with my moral outlook. Once I have ascertained this aspect, I try to understand the economic potential that the project can have and how I can raise the funds necessary to produce it.

In general I would say, after you refine your craft, go for what you like. Do not accept any compromise. Be brave and unscrupulous too: all or nothing. As went the British Air Force motto of the Second World War: “Who dares, wins”.

Film producer Federico Guarascio shares behind-the-scenes insights

AM – Can you give us 2 or 3 highlights from your nearly 10-year career as a producer working on films in partnership with crews based in the United States?

FG – One of the best experiences I have had here has been working with Academy Award-winner Ellen Goosenberg Kent for her latest documentary now on HBO, “Torn Apart,” which was a real gem, and gave me a concrete example of the efficiency of high-level American productions. I was lucky enough to work from Italy in partnership with US-based crews, then relocated to the US from late 2018, joining my colleagues in the US that Fall to work hands-on on this and similar projects. Being in step with the US film crews opened my eyes to how incredible working in film in the United States could be professionally. 

AM – Through your career working on over 20 films, what are a few films you have worked on that have really stood out to you in forming your career and your mindset as a producer?

FG – “Odysseus Gambit” was certainly the first job that made me understand the rules of the game and showed me my potential as a film producer. We had started the project without a budget and arrived at Sundance. A great success that I still remember with pride!

AM – What projects do you have in the works now, and what do you hope to work on in the near future?

FG – With Alex we are thinking of transforming “The Fourth Kingdom” into a narrative work. I am already seeking funding for this next step in Italy; stay tuned..!

Female Agency Reaches a Climax in “Female Trouble”, Western Exhibitions, Opening January 10th

Hysteria is a dirty word, and those who use it may not be aware of its context as a means of subjugating women to prejudice for.. millennia. As long ago as Ancient Greece, philosopher Hippocrates applied a related Greek term to women as a means of classifying them as incapable of rational thought. Vogue notes, “The womb, thought Plato (and Hippocrates), was believed to lurch up and down the body, upsetting a woman’s delicate constitution. This illness was called hysterike pnix, or “the suffocation of the womb,” and was believed to cause erratic and unreliable behavior.” The exhibition “Female Trouble” opens January 10, 2020 at Western Exhibitions, co-produced by the women-led Elijah Wheat Showroom, features artists Amanda Joy CalobrisiLilli Carré, Qinza NajmKathryn Refi and Frances Waite in dialogue with the legacy of misogyny pervading modern and contemporary culture, directly challenging this long-held belief through a conceptual, interdisciplinary lens.

Qinza Najm, “Red Cross” 86×63” acrylic on carpet (2019)


The topic of women’s bodies is addressed with particular fervor in “Female Trouble.” Works by the artists depict the implied body, or the power of the presence (or absence) of the female body in their works. The pervasive power balance delineating gender is at play in these works, on view at Western Exhibitions through Feb 22, 2020.

Frances Waite approaches the body as it relates to the larger environment, inhabiting both the corporeal and the Anthropocene in equal measure. The artist presents drawings that inhabit both reality and the hyper-real, envisioning humans as mammals inhabiting their larger realm.  Kathryn Refi inhabits the realm between information and interpretation, where data meets translation into results. Her work, while abstract, presents images that create an abstracted visual of our everyday lives.



Amanda Joy Calobrisi explores erotica and female empowerment- a means of embracing women’s genitals as a means of impressing power forward onto the viewers’ psyche. Lille Carré similarly implies women’s’ bodies in her interdisciplinary practice. Her clay works especially embrace both the abstract and the implications of gender simultaneously.

Qinza Najm, “4 Grey Road” 48×24” acrylic on carpet (2017)

 

Artist Qinza Najm approaches the misogynist roots of hysteria with a lens as a woman with roots in a culture historical marginalized over centuries of colonialism. She notes of her approach to the body as primary mode of interpretation in her interdisciplinary works, “I often use motifs of bodies stretched, deconstructed, distorted, and pushed beyond their limits. A manipulated body is a reflection of how power is exerted upon our being.” Perhaps there is no more appropriate encapsulation of the necessity of claiming female bodily autonomy and agency in an era in which women’s rights to claim their body as they wish are constantly being eroded by privileged men in positions of power.

“Female Trouble” remains on view from its opening Friday, January 10, 6-8 pm until February 22, 2020. More information is available on the gallery’s is website: https://westernexhibitions.com/exhibition/female-trouble/

Artist Esperanza Cortes Explores the Legacy of Mining in “Arrested Symphony” Opening Jan 4, 2020

The earth beneath our feet serves as the subject of choice for artist Esperanza Cortes in her current exhibit, “Arrested Symphony,” on view at Jonathan Ferrera gallery in New Orleans, LA with an opening celebration from 6-9 pm on Sat, Jan 4th. The artist is specifically interested in the minerals and elements that can be mined and utilized from the soil: extracted ethically or… otherwise. Cortes’ work shines a light on the darker sides of gemstones, investigating the implications of how rare and precious substances become a source of geopolitical trauma. The Colombian-born, America-based artist works with an object-based approach to examine injustice in contemporary society. The fragmentary faces and delicate, shimmering cascade of chains defining works such as “Arrested Symphony” (2017) (below) serve as both an elegy and a hopeful perspective, a longing for renewal.

 

“Arrested Symphony” (2017) clay, chains, semi precious stones, encaustic and oil on panel Image courtesy Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

The underpinning themes of injustice and the human cost of labor simmer beneath the surface of Cortes’ delicate and evocative artworks. The artist has a penchant for cretaing artwork that appeals to the sense: inspiring a lingering sense of wanting to touch: wanting to examine more closely. Her hanging installation works in particular – “Suspended Thoughts” – utilizes beads, clay and wood to comment on hierarchy and hegemony. The artist’s lingering dialogue with the effects of colonialization permeate the exhibition: a concurrent theme running alongside the inquiry into how blood diamonds and mining for uranium have been produced at tragic human cost. Cortes has the subtle talent of hinting around the issues that underpin our society. Her work serves to provoke a reconsideration of the means by which we have arrived at where we are now. Through a measured blend of texture and material, Cortes creates new pathways of discovering – and uncovering – why we are living in the world today by examining what we built in the past.

With this exhibition, the artist returns to the borders of the Carribbean that reach the shores of her homeland Colombia, as New Orleans rests on the shoulders of the Gulf of Mexico. The weight of examining the context of the post-colonial in contemporary art is especially poignant in this colonial port city. Her engagement with postcolonial dialogue persists through various fellowships with the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, BRIC Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. Through these initiatives, the artist mounts a multi-disciplinary practice that continues to push the boundaries of contemporary art’s ability to grapple with this complex, convoluted legacy. The exhibit opened on December 18, and will host an opening reception on Saturday, January 4th from 6-9 pm during the New Orleans Art District’s upcoming Saturday Arts Walk. With a second opening to fête the exhibition those same evening hours on February 1, the exhibit remains open through Friday, February 14, 2020.

“Arrested Symphony” at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, solo show of works by Esperanza Cortes on view through Feb 14, 2020