Performance is Alive x ANTE. Performance Picks at Satellite Art Show NYC Oct 3-6 2019

October 3-6 marks the inaugural edition of Satellite Art Show in Brooklyn, and along with that comes the most significant collection of live & recorded performance art ever presented by Performance is Alive.

ANTE. Mag is proud to serve as Media Sponsor for this groundbreaking performance art presentation by Performance is Alive – a survey of the most exciting emerging and mid-career performance/new media artists with an intersectional lens, representing a diverse group of bodies and identities. Don’t miss the full roster of Performance is Alive-curated programming, with two especially notable events occurring Friday, October 4th at 8 pm when notable artist Barbara Rosenthal discusses her work in tandem with a screening of “News to Fit the Family” and Saturday, October 5th at noon for “Queer Form: A Panel Discussion” centered around queer body politics in new media and performance – for full list of events, follow the Performance is Alive Schedule on their Facebook page and also available HERE.

AlisonPirie_PressImage2_PerformanceDocumentationbyLiaHanson - Alison Pirie
Alison Pirie for “Performance is Alive” Satellite Art Show NYC 2019

Now on to our Top 12 ANTE. Mag picks for Performance is Alive @ Satellite Art Show, October 3-6, 2019…

  1. Alison Pirie a juggernaut working across performance, installation, new media and more, Pirie juggles simultaneous explorations of gender, identity, language and sexuality: with a particular lens onto female sexuality and the concept of “female hysteria”. With past projects at LaMama Galeria in NYC and the Situation Room in LA, Pirie is a force of nature to be reckoned with in her powerful considerations of these contemporary themes. Make sure to experience her performance on opening night at Performance is Alive: she will be presenting her work Thursday, 10/3 at Satellite.
  2. Kathie Halfin – living and working in the Bronx, Russian-Israeli artist Halfin is an interdisciplinary artist working across installation, performance, sound and costume production. Her performances tease out the nuanced narratives attached to female objectification. Halfin holds an MFA from the School of Visual Arts, and is affiliated with Wassaic Project, Vermont Studio Center, the Bronx Museum and more.
  3. Amanda Hunt & IV Castellanos – a collaboration that has lent itself to a studied exploration in reciprocity through repetitive catching of one another’s bodies, Hunt & IV Castellanos sets the stage for a longed-for Queer and Feminist Utopia. The artists have performed in the US and abroad, creating a set of actions in tandem that seek to provoke audiences to re-examine social approaches to equanimity and labor.
  4. SUNGJAE LEE – based in Chicago, LEE is a multidisciplinary artist whose work investigates periphery and its relationship to center. An MFA Graduate in Performance from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, LEE has presented works in the US, Canada, and South Korea among other locations. The artist’s candid and perceptive responses to other-ing augment Performance is Alive’s 2019 programming.
  5. Wild Actions (Patience, Carley McCready-Bingham, Ginger Wagg) – Hailing from North Carolina, Wild Actions presents a sculpture garden for Performance is Alive that presents their focus on interactive performance installations. Their radical, performative and eco-conscious approach marks a breath of fresh air among the PIA presentations.
  6. Barbara Rosenthal – A conceptual artist working across (seemingly) limitless mediums, Rosenthal’s inclusion into Performance is Alive is a true coup. The artist will be present on Friday, Oct 4 for a screening – as noted above – and any true connoisseurs of performance and conceptual art should be in attendance. Based in the West Village, Rosenthal has influenced modern art and philosophy: influence which continues to exert its presence through her projects based in the present day.
  7. Nadja Verena Marcin – An artist working across borders in Germany and the United States, Marcin’s multidisciplinary work across photography, video, and more exudes a deceptive straightforward quality. The artist engages across a broad platform of eco-conservation, feminism, and sociopolitical inquiry. Catch her work while you can on view at Performance is Alive!
  8. Katina Bitsicas – Exploring trauma, crime and the psychological presence of architecture on the human psyche, “other”ing and the personal experiences driving overarching social justice issues. A new media artist who has shown in the US and abroad, Bistsicas’ work delves deep into issues that are driving contemporary political discourse in the United States.
  9. Tales Frey – A founding member of eRevista Performatus, Frey’s artistic practice explores elements relating to body and ritual. A multidisciplinary artist, works by Frey have been exhibited across Latin America and Europe and involve incisive visual constructions to form social commentaries.
  10. Sylvain Souklaye – A sound, video and performance artist, Souklaye contrats personal narrative with collective memory, identity and demographic. His works have been shown in Europe and Latin America, and involve performative acts by the artist as well as interaction with diverse populations in disparate urban centers.
  11. Cherrie Yu – Yu’s work mines pop culture and performativity in equal measure through a practice rooted in new media and performance. Ideals attached to assignations such as “queer” and “open” are interrogated through surveys of existing bodies of work by and by placing the spectator in a dissociative state in relationship to other “bodies” – such as in interdisciplinary performance and new media installation. Yu’s new media work will be displayed as part of “Performance is Alive”.
  12. Rachel L. Rampleman – Brooklyn-based artist Rampleman explores identity and spectacle – intimacy and grandeur – through a multi-disciplinary lens. With solo exhibits in the US and abroad, the artist’s work delves into the latent tension underlying masculine and feminine identities.

Clockwise from upper left: Artists featured at Performance is Alive include Kathie Halfin, Igor Furtado and Sylvain Souklaye.

ABOUT PERFORMANCE IS ALIVE
Based in Brooklyn, NYC, Performance Is Alive is an online platform featuring the work and words of current performance art practitioners. Through interviews, artist features, sponsorship and curatorial projects, we aim to support the performance community while offering an access point to the performance curious. Performance is Alive at SATELLITE ART SHOW is curated by Quinn Dukes (Founder + Director). | performanceisalive.com

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ANTE. Mag is dedicated to bringing under-the-radar contemporary artists to a wider audience. To this end, ANTE.’s Editorial team specifically focuses on highlighting works by intersectional artists and cultural producers to our readership. If you believe you are working on a project that fits this description and deserves wider recognition, please email our editor: audra@antemag.com

America’s Diverse Social Tapestry Shines with “IN/FLUX” on view at Pelham Art Center

by Elizabeth Barenis

 

On view at Pelham Art Center through November 2nd, “IN/FLUX” – co-curated by PAC Director Charlotte Mouquin and Gallery Advisory Board Member Victoria Rolett – features works by compelling contemporary artists wielding their perspectives on immigration as expressed through various mediums. Ranging from photography to painting, installation art to collage, artists on view don’t shy away from aspects of immigration – positive and negative – that have shaped the scope of their respective artistic practices. Artists on view include Corina S. Alvarezdelugo, Selin Balci, Nicky Enright, Jenny Polak, Alejandra Hernandez, David Rios Ferreira, Omid Shekari, Ruben Natal San Miguel, Natalia Nakazawa and Victoria-Idongesit Udondian. The works exude a sense that the wider narrative diversity brings to the table creates a more intriguing contemporary art experience.

The Republic of Unknown Territory by Victoria-Idongesit Udondian for IN/FLUX

Visitors to this unique survey exhibition are greeted at the entrance by sounds of immigrants reflecting on their experiences as captured by Victoria-Idongesit Udondian for her installation, “The Republic of Unknown Territory.” Various articles of clothing are scattered throughout the space, suspended in hidden narratives that allude to both the absence and presence of their owners.

Engaged with the macro, rather than micro, elements of immigration, artist Natalia Nakazawa creates a map of woven threads manifesting the journeys that immigrants have taken to start new lives for themselves in their chosen homes. Denoting trade and travel along immigrant pathways, Nakazawa creates her works by incorporating participation into her process. Similarly engaged with fabrics and mixed materials, this work contrasts with Udondian’s installation in its bird’s-eye view of the effects which immigration exerts on an international scale.

Our Stories of Migration tapestry by Natalia Nakazawa for IN/FLUX

Ferreira’s pop-infused postcolonial drawings peel apart the layers of mythology and truth that comprise each immigrant’s personal history as well as society’s response to immigration. The colorful hues spanning intricate drawings in Ferreira’s works speak to an overarching, allegorical immigrant experience: a wider narrative that embraces aspects of varying sociopolitical relationships and international transportation.

Similarly engaged with maps, travel and transportation, Corina S. Alvarezdelugo’s collage works meld imagery unpacking the emotional weight of what lays near and far, subjects both intimate and remote.

David Rios Ferreira with his Drawings for the opening of IN/FLUX

 

Corina S. Alvarezdelugo’s Pangaea for IN/FLUX

On view at Pelham Art Center from September 20-November 2nd, “IN/FLUX” will host a variety of immigration-themed programming over the course of its time at the Center. These events include:

Afro-Puerto Rican Bomba celebration with BombaYo! – Sunday, Sept. 22nd 2-4pm
Diwali the Hindu festival of lights – Sunday, Oct. 6th 2-4pm
Mexican Day of the Dead – Sunday, Oct. 27th 2-4pm
There will be additional performance art during ArtsFest weekend Oct. 4-6th

Jay Milder’s “Unblotting the Rainbow” Hosts Official Opening Sept 27

Friday, September 27th marks the grand opening celebration of painter Jay Milder’s formidable “Unblotting the Rainbow”, curated by Adam Zucker and on view at the Provincetown Art Association & Museum through Nov 10, 2019.

“Animistic Ark” (2015) Jay Milder

 

“Unblotting the Rainbow” marks a pivotal moment in Milder’s career: the painter, already a household name in Brazil, has an upcoming solo exhibition at the Casa de Mexico in Havana, Cuba in May 2020.

Born in Omaha, Milder exploded onto the scene alongside contemporaries Red Grooms and Claes Oldenberg, and his experimental approach to painting – focused through his intense reflections on spiritual mysticism – informing his changing artistic vision. At times abstract while adopting a scale of figurative elements over the years, the artist relies on elements such as Kabbalah and numerology to inform his compositions. A keen balance of formal qualities imbues his practice with a meditative presence. Works on view in “Unblotting the Rainbow” chart the artist’s continual progress from his roots as an emerging artist in the 1950s through today. As curator Adam Zucker notes, “(the exhibit) focus(es)…on his use of painterly Expressionism as a means to address physical and spiritual themes affecting the human condition. For Milder, it’s a return to exhibiting in Provincetown, a community that had a tremendous impact on his career.” The artist began an ongoing relationship with the Provincetown area in the late 1950s, maintaining links to the area and experiencing formative days and months learning from others in the close knit community. A homecoming of sorts for the artist, Milder continues to push artistic boundaries while maintaining his place as a premiere artist advancing American modern expressionism.

Noah’s Ark #1 (2002) Jay Milder


Along with an opening to the public on Friday, August 27 from 8 pm on, the artist will also be giving a talk on Sunday, August 29 at the Provincetown Art Association and Museum from 1 pm. See the PAAM’s website for more details: https://www.paam.org/exhibitions/jay-milder-unblotting-the-rainbow/

Joan Walton’s Transcendent Works Shine in “Montauk Love Song”

“Montauk Love Song” celebrates its opening on Thursday, Sept 27 from 6-8 pm at Atlantic Gallery, suite 540, 547 W 27th street NYC. The opening is free and open to the public and the artist will be present.

 

Closing Party: Pat McCarthy’s NikNak’s City Cart @ ENTRANCE

While remaining on view through August 11, Thursday August 8 marks the closing celebration for artist Pat McCarthy’s NikNak’s City Cart at ENTRANCE gallery, 48 Ludlow St. 

Works on view by Pat McCarthy on ENTRANCE gallery main floor, “Pages 1-9” (Xerox on paper, stainless steel)

From 6 pm on, the artist will be celebrating this body of work – influenced by Gordon Matta-Clark and the Rivington School – at ENTRANCE gallery, created in homage to the recent loss of his dachsund, Nik Nak (Naknikiya, or “hot dog” in Hebrew). This “hot dog” cart project also references the artist’s ongoing work with pigeons, merging the organic and the artificial in mixed-media, multidisciplinary constructions on view at the gallery’s upstairs and downstairs project space. The project itself has incorporated participatory art elements, with a final sculpture culminating from the various drawings contributed by participants outlining the monuments and edifices of New York City’s streets – a city that pigeons know all too well.

NikNak’s City Cart in situ in front of ENTRANCE

“…we’ll demolish the cart on the street and with the materials (the beautiful quilted stainless
steel) I’ll craft a model of the city, based on the community’s designs,” notes McCarthy. August 8th starting at 6 pm, visitors will have the opportunity to witness this new model of the City as transformed from the original presentation of the hot dog cart on the street in front of ENTRANCE. The artist himself will be on hand along with gallery directors to explain and walk guests through works on view as part of the project.

Views of NikNak’s City Cart transforming, ENTRANCE gallery (48 Ludlow)

NikNak’s City Cart evinces a type of experimentation and open source community participation that the Lower East Side has sorely been missing. Don’t skip out on a chance to witness the final sculpture marking the evolution of Pat McCarthy’s NikNak’s City Cart Thursday August 8th, 2019 from 6 pm and catch the full exhibit before its end on August 11th at ENTRANCE, 48 Ludlow Street!

 

-ANTE. Ed.s

 

“Topsy-Turvy” Featuring Artist Jeff Way Shakes Things Up Lesley Heller Gallery

Artist Jeff Way’s series of multi-process artworks on view in “Topsy Turvy” at Lesley Hellery Gallery proves to be  that rare exhibition where each work possesses a unique yet harmonious vantage point onto a recurring theme. Marking an ingenious turn of creative processes combined with a speculative approach to composition and figuration, Way’s “Topsy Turvy” series – created between 2006-2016 – offer an alternative viewpoint onto painting as seen through distortion created by methods of reproduction: chiefly, a Xerox machine. The exhibit, opening on Wednesday, July 17 from 6-8 pm at Lesley Hellery gallery, is all the more compelling as it shines a light onto these works in their first solo foray out into the New York art world.

Latent tension between repetition and uniqueness mark a crux of the series’ premise: each painting is unique and newly created, while Xerox was invented to copy existing documents. Way plays with the purpose behind this once-cutting edge technology in his recent series by distorting imagery nearly to its breaking point in this series of engrossing works: strong color contrasts span across each work, building up and breaking down across the canvas. Way is that rare artist whose dedication to color doesn’t overwhelm the composition: instead, line and coloration combine in a frank, captivating look into the artist’s psyche. One enthralling aspect of this exhibition is its self-conscious meditation upon the previous series of the artist’s own work: a multi-disciplinary artist whose works have spanned museum walls ranging from the Whitney Museum to the New Museum, Way is able to confront and re-imagine the same impulses that have ignited his recognition in major institutions both in NYC and farther afield.

Grid Head Yellow Green Nose (2007) Acrylic on Canvas

While these paintings mark a departure from the artist’s previous series of masks and mask-based performance, remnants of these same considerations are found in the distorted, multivalent heads present throughout the artist’s “Topsy Turvy” series. While larger arrays of his figurative elements can evoke, upon reflection, Picasso’s Les Demoiselles d’Avignon or Gauguin’s Where Do We Come From? What Are We? Where Are We Going?, Way instead seeks inspiration instead from the jarring impression left by German Expressionists Jawlensky and Nolde. With a firm grounding in Art History at NYU prior to transitioning to graduate as a Studio Art major, Way is in tune with his own personal iconography residing in his repetitive contemplation of the head as a symbol for self-expression and the psychological underpinnings arising from such endeavors. The artist will also be at Lesley Heller gallery for a talk accompanying the exhibition, slated for July 31, 2019 at 6:30 pm.

Topsy-Turvy Trio 3 (2016) Acrylic on Canvas

On view through August 17th, “Topsy Turvy” is a sweeping exhibition at Lesley Hellery gallery of works by Jeff Way that are not only exhibited for the first time as a complete series in New York City, but also offer forth the unique vision of an artist with deep ties to the evolution of New York City’s contemporary art scene.

There is No Room for Colonizer, White Savior Mentality in Art Criticism – or Anywhere

This opinion piece represents the views of the Editors at ANTE. Mag. It was written as a direct response to the Whitehot Mag article, “Kill Your Darlings: The End of the White Male Ally” which in turn was a response to the NY Times’ “The Dominance of the White Male Critic”

-Ed.s, ANTE. Mag

 

There is nowhere to begin this article.

There is nowhere to begin – because the subject of this article is all around us, it is limitless, boundless. It affects what we say in polite society, what we talk about with museum funders, collectors – those in positions of power. But power is bounded by silence: the type of silence that reifies the entrenched systems of oppressor and oppressed that has persisted since the first Portugese slave ships set off from the island of Goree off of the West coast of Senegal, and long, long before.

It is wrapped in the embrace of those same systems of power that enable police officers to turn off their bodycams and plead innocence even while causing suffering to our brothers and sisters, like Eric Garner – it spans far and wide in underground networks, supporting entrenched inequality from homeownership and credit to college admissions, the use of public space, the right to assume a place in the art world. The right to have a voice – any voice, much less to assume a position of authority. The right to exist alongside and in spite of a culture rooted in hatred for the very autonomy of others. The right to not be questioned or accused of representing a “threat” to an established majority.

When allies demand to be recognized for their efforts, they undermine the very platform for marginalization they purport to support. When ego overcomes the hard work put in to empathize with those whose experiences in life have not been defined by the lines of privilege, they lose the ability to be true advocates.

What angry white men, whether in Congress or in Art Journalism, conveniently ignore is this: there will never not be room for white cis male writers in the art world: in every aspect of our world. By insisting otherwise, these critics undermine efforts to recognize and confront the persistent, inevitable influence of white supremacy continuing to determine the trajectory of our culture and the world at large.

By ignoring that the pathways are already uneven, that our very foundations are built upon the flawed premise of white supremacy, these “saviors” of cis, white male art critics everywhere deny a pervasive force – they may as well deny the existence of the magnetic field. Just because a force cannot be made manifest, and remains invisible, does not mean that it effects are not seen.

When hegemony exists – that-which-must-not-be-named, white supremacy – it is our duty collectively, as marginalized voices, as allies, to call it out. To provoke it, not to pacify it. To question it, not to submit to it. There is no reason to support a status quo that continually dampens the spirit of those bright voices who have always existed and who form our future – people of color, women and non-gender conforming folks, those of diverse sexual orientations, religions, backgrounds.

Too often, those who have privilege never understand the effects of everyday life that terrorize those who don’t “present” like them. Those who have experienced these effects are often silenced or disparaged when they present their truths to a wider public – they become Anita Hill’s, Christine Blasey Ford’s, the greater “radical other” in our collective consciousness. They become widely disparaged, threatened – challenged.

Demonized.

Here is a great barometer for equality: would this collective Shunning or “Other”-ing happen to someone who represents a white, cishet male member of the hegemony? Would they be run out of town, have their lives threatened, be demonized and disparaged for daring to stand up to a power structure that – oh wait, they are the power structure. The fiber of their own, elevated histories sustains and supports that same, buried power structure that subjugates those who do not subscribe to a white, colonizer patriarchal mentality.

This mentality feeds an endemic system of thought that silences voices from the margins, holds back new ways of seeing and processing: prevents new connections to form between underrepresented voices and those who represent them and – even more critically – prevents us all from reaching our true potential as a society by stifling voices of genius through fear, coercion or threat. This process is fundamentally de-humanizing to those who have keenly felt the piercing threat of white supremacy.

Venice Biennale Golden Lion Award-winning artist Arthur Jafa notes that his practice centers around the idea that empathy is key to his practice. “The people who are dehumanizing others are trying to maintain or hold onto the sense of their own humanity,” reflects Jafa. “Ultimately it comes down to the relative presence or absence of empathy. You cannot oppress people without expending a certain type of psychic energy, unless the whole mechanism, the whole superstructure is supporting that understanding of the other as being less human, less feeling than you are. I think you learn empathy. I think it has to be taught.”(1)

A self-appointed savior is not exercising empathy, and their remonstrations of justice or demands for consideration for the pitiable, cishet white male – those who have never tasted the angry steel of prejudice – smack of hypocrisy and egotistical protests. The measure of the threat they perceive is in direct response to the lack of their own ability to empathize with the internalized oppression that marginalized members of American society – of our world at large – have unfortunately learned to anticipate every day.

Colonizers and white saviors have no place in guiding us forward in a realm where ingrained prejudice is giving way at slow, small intervals to inclusion and diversity of opinion – so slowly that the monolithic cliff face preserving colonizers’ value systems is still firmly recognizable.

The perspicacity of artist Titus Kaphar’s insights in 2017 holds true today. He notes of the criminal justice system’s glaring inequalities that a careful and circumstantial examination of the realities of the existing system must be dealt with in order for evolution to have a firm foundation to rest upon. “I’m heartsick and sorry about it at the same time,” notes Kaphar, “because in the justice world it…a deeper investigation of the issues is standard. You dig deep to find out answers, and you look more into the issues, and you try to come to some conclusions. Then you try to work towards change.”(2)

Kaphar continues, “The art world is not like that, and that’s where my fear comes from. The art world can be extremely fickle. The art world is often about just what’s novel. I don’t want this to just become one of those issues that’s in fashion right now, and therefore we’re making art about it. That would be disheartening.” (2)

Too often, subtle changes and improvements in social justice for minorities are measured in relation to a majority: we ask, why there is a need to place distinct populations in direct opposition? Why is an increased presence of POC, non-male identifying, LGBTQIA+ art critics such a threat to an entrenched bevy of white cis-male art critics?

Where does the threat lie for a hegemony that feels happy to highlight artists and creators of diverse backgrounds, but suddenly chafes at the idea that they may not be in the best position to do so?

In seeking answers to this frequently occurring yet problematic phenomenon, I came across a formidable article written by Henry Louis Gates, Jr. – hardly an unrecognized voice in contemporary American culture. His reflection on the period of Reconstruction, a bright and shining moment between the defeat of the Confederate states and the rise of Jim Crow laws in the United States, merits particular scrutiny. “Reconstruction, the period in American history that followed the Civil War, was an era filled with great hope and expectations, but it proved far too short to ensure a successful transition from bondage to free labor for the almost 4 million black human beings who’d been born into slavery in the U.S., “(3) notes Gates. He continues on, tracing the rise of overzealous white supremacists who had suddenly found the foundation of their very existence shattered by the insistence of another population of American society that they were equal to them in every way despite the atrocities of bondage they had been subjected to in this country. Gates reflects on this period of promise in American history. “Reconstruction was fundamentally about who got to be an American citizen.”(3)

One wonders whether the same white men who had dominated American society to that point were protesting, ultimately, whether this was all too much. Were they wondering if they were being erased, much as contemporary white, cishet male critics now argue today?

Reconstruction is a particularly dirty word in the South, where I was born. As a white women descended from a firmly middle class, non-plantation owning family, it never occurred to me that I was heir to a force that was tearing apart the very fabric of what it meant for Americans to feel free. There were the hesitant looks of the older black man who worked with my grandfather, who kept his eyes bowed when I was around, as well as the firmly segregated church congregations that still (for the most part) continue to permeate Southern society. Born and raised part-time a stone’s throw from where Arthur Jafa is from  – Jafa, a Howard-educated, prize-winning, internationally recognized artist – I rejoice at the prominence of an African-American artist on the world stage who has known the darkness of suspect glances and long stares in the Mississippi Delta – and I find myself destroyed by the fact that he, or the millions of other descendants of Africans kidnapped by Europeans and brought to the new world, have ever had to inhabit a world that told them they were not good enough.

The world changes, but never soon enough.

Jubilant periods arrive – the era of Reconstruction, a black American president – and are followed by suspicion, threats to “whiteness”, perceived enmity.

The pendulum never swings one way.

Thankfully there exists a long legacy of cultural criticism of colonization. I won’t flatten it here for lip service, though it spans the many paradigm-shifting theorists ranging from Frantz Fanon to James Baldwin, to Deborah Willis, to Kellie Jones. Who is to argue that there wasn’t a need for cultural criticism and engagement with diverse art theories, for educated cultural theorists who are not white cis-het males, to comment on an expanded view of what constituted art and cultural heritage?

How poor would our legacy of cultural criticism be today without these formidable thought leaders! And who take up the mantle now to argue that there is “enough” now – that there doesn’t need to be an ever-expanding, level playing field for art critics and cultural producers of diverse viewpoints to continue to grow, engaging with a range of cultural contemporaries far beyond the prominently white, cis-het male artist-dominated era of, oh I don’t know, every century before this one?

I see color. I recognize the significance that two prominent cultural figures, Okwui Enwezor and Audre Lorde, have continued to influence how I approach cultural criticism and art theory. I appreciate the efforts it has taken for them, and other public figures of diverse backgrounds, to emerge on the international stage to a place of prominence.

But I recognize I am not the sole reference point of iconic thought leaders like these – there are rising, marginalized voices in art criticism and cultural theory who are able to learn from and identify with those who have come before and paved the way, seeing those who have come before – those who have achieved all this while looking like them. This is far more valuable than any tired platitude, repeated bon mot or expression of encouragement. This recognition that greatness has come before – this is even greater than the promise of tomorrow. It is, in fact, the proof that tomorrow can exist beyond the concept of “whiteness.”

In the words of the incredible Betye Saar, “It’s a way of delving into the past and reaching into the future simultaneously.”(4)

By confronting the past, present and our future with honesty, clarity and humility – and most of all, with empathy – we can recognize that as allies, it is only by taking the time to pause – taking the time to listen – that we can allow space for the tired epithet of “white savior” to finally wither away, crushed under the weight of its own bloated fallacy.

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1. Jafa, Arthur and Tina Campt. “Love Is the Message, The Plan Is Death.” E. Accessed July 09, 2019. https://www.e-flux.com/journal/81/126451/love-is-the-message-the-plan-is-death/.

2. Keller, Bill. “Titus Kaphar on Art, Race and Justice.” The Marshall Project. February 02, 2017. Accessed July 09, 2019. https://www.themarshallproject.org/2017/02/01/titus-kaphar-on-art-race-and-justice.

3. Jr., Henry Louis Gates. “How Reconstruction Still Shapes Racism in America.” Time. April 02, 2019. Accessed July 09, 2019. https://time.com/5562869/reconstruction-history/.

4. Artist Statement by Betye Saar. Accessed July 09, 2019. http://www.betyesaar.net/.