Voices in Unison for “Conversations: Artists in Dialogue” at FIT

Curator Lobsang Tsewang (FIT, Fine Arts Alum ’17) arranged the exhibition “Conversations: Artists in Dialogue” to invite the greater FIT community to come together in solidarity by contributing their unique voices into this group show. Featuring FIT students, alumni, faculty and selected guest artists, the exhibit opens up the conversation around contemporary art that is inclusive of all perspectives in the university community.
Artists on view include students Camelia Giannouklas, Ellen Marszalkowski, Daniel Elias Pascual, Sienna Prater, Matthew Stewart, John Xavier; alumni Dimitri Dimizas, Carly Fitzsimons, Madjeen Isaac, Kathleen Johnson, Claire Jones, Olivia Reckert, Briget Villanueva; faculty and staff N’Ketiah Brakohiapa, Pansum Cheng, Bill Pangburn, Melanie Reim, Jeff Way; and guest artists Meny Beriro, Jay Feigelis, Amanda Guest, Brece Honeycutt, Molly Ann Walker. In light of the current viral pandemic, the exhibition is temporarily closed but will re-open to the public and is still visible for those living nearby who pass by the windows of FIT campus that run along 7th Avenue.
Installation view, “Conversations: Artwork in Dialogue”at FIT’s Art and Design gallery
A mix of material, color and line are interspersed throughout the exhibition space. Form and composition intermingle across sculpture, mixed media works and paintings, with a range of artistic practices on display. The exhibition is a master class in contrasting scale: the volume of space is appropriately used to feature the range of artwork incorporated in this group show.
Standout exhibitors include illustrator Melanie Reim, installation and print artist Bill Pangburn, painter and interdisciplinary artist Jeff Way and mixed media artist Amanda Guest. Associate Dean, School of Art and Design at FIT/ artist Melanie Reim‘s careful linework and intricate detail are a pleasure to study intently in the gallery space, and are carefully arranged in dialogue with nearby artworks. FIT Faculty member Bill Pangburn’s expansive style of abstraction encompass the visitor with a studied calm, blending color and line in careful harmony.
FIT faculty member Jeff Way displays paintings from his recent Eccentric Squares series, which showcases Way’s carefully coordinated sense of depth in the composition constructed through controlled lines delineating the picture plane. Guest artist Amanda Guest displays powerful mixed media work that sparks a dialogue around the visceral aspects of formal composition and texture.
Installation view, “Conversations: Artwork in Dialogue”at FIT’s Art and Design gallery
Installation view, “Conversations: Artwork in Dialogue”at FIT’s Art and Design gallery (Jeff Way painting featured in front left)
Exhibition curator Tsewang notes that his vision for the exhibition is that the exhibition… “enables each voice to be heard in the context of the exchange as a whole.”
Premised in the ability for differing artistic practices, mediums and processes to situate contemporary discourse within a harmonious discussion instead of a cacophony, “Conversations: Artwork in Dialogue” mounts an impressive survey show of artists engaging with FIT’s creative community with something to contribute.
While the exhibition is temporarily closed due to the viral pandemic, stay tuned at the FIT website – here – to learn more about the show hours during Spring/Summer 2020.
Installation view, “Conversations: Artwork in Dialogue”at FIT’s Art and Design gallery

Artist Esperanza Cortes Explores the Legacy of Mining in “Arrested Symphony” Opening Jan 4, 2020

The earth beneath our feet serves as the subject of choice for artist Esperanza Cortes in her current exhibit, “Arrested Symphony,” on view at Jonathan Ferrera gallery in New Orleans, LA with an opening celebration from 6-9 pm on Sat, Jan 4th. The artist is specifically interested in the minerals and elements that can be mined and utilized from the soil: extracted ethically or… otherwise. Cortes’ work shines a light on the darker sides of gemstones, investigating the implications of how rare and precious substances become a source of geopolitical trauma. The Colombian-born, America-based artist works with an object-based approach to examine injustice in contemporary society. The fragmentary faces and delicate, shimmering cascade of chains defining works such as “Arrested Symphony” (2017) (below) serve as both an elegy and a hopeful perspective, a longing for renewal.

 

“Arrested Symphony” (2017) clay, chains, semi precious stones, encaustic and oil on panel Image courtesy Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

The underpinning themes of injustice and the human cost of labor simmer beneath the surface of Cortes’ delicate and evocative artworks. The artist has a penchant for cretaing artwork that appeals to the sense: inspiring a lingering sense of wanting to touch: wanting to examine more closely. Her hanging installation works in particular – “Suspended Thoughts” – utilizes beads, clay and wood to comment on hierarchy and hegemony. The artist’s lingering dialogue with the effects of colonialization permeate the exhibition: a concurrent theme running alongside the inquiry into how blood diamonds and mining for uranium have been produced at tragic human cost. Cortes has the subtle talent of hinting around the issues that underpin our society. Her work serves to provoke a reconsideration of the means by which we have arrived at where we are now. Through a measured blend of texture and material, Cortes creates new pathways of discovering – and uncovering – why we are living in the world today by examining what we built in the past.

With this exhibition, the artist returns to the borders of the Carribbean that reach the shores of her homeland Colombia, as New Orleans rests on the shoulders of the Gulf of Mexico. The weight of examining the context of the post-colonial in contemporary art is especially poignant in this colonial port city. Her engagement with postcolonial dialogue persists through various fellowships with the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, BRIC Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. Through these initiatives, the artist mounts a multi-disciplinary practice that continues to push the boundaries of contemporary art’s ability to grapple with this complex, convoluted legacy. The exhibit opened on December 18, and will host an opening reception on Saturday, January 4th from 6-9 pm during the New Orleans Art District’s upcoming Saturday Arts Walk. With a second opening to fête the exhibition those same evening hours on February 1, the exhibit remains open through Friday, February 14, 2020.

“Arrested Symphony” at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, solo show of works by Esperanza Cortes on view through Feb 14, 2020

The Oracle Alights: New Visions from Julia Sinelnikova at Miami’s Satellite Art Fair

Disorienting twinkling lights move through sinuous sculptural forms. Sparkling silver surfaces spin, bouncing beams of light in patterns like a disco ball.
The Oracle (AKA Julia Sinelnikova) always has new adventures in wait for visitors encountering her newest holographic sculptures, and this Dec 4-8 at Satellite Art Show Miami event will be no different. Installations and performances will supplement brand new hand-cut holographic sculptures, on view in The Oracle’s Satellite Art Show in Miami, Florida.
Julia Sinelnikova AKA the Oracle at Satellite Art Show Brooklyn

Coming off the heels of a successful presentation at Satellite Art Show in Brooklyn, NY – Sinelnikova’s installation images made the cover page of Artnet and was listed as a top NYC art event – the next phase of the artist’s sculptures will take viewers on a mystical multi-dimensional adventure. Taking cues from her existing Fairy Organ series along with her recent “Sky Shard” installation in Gilbertsville, NY, The Oracle creates new pathways of holographic art experiences for visitors to Satellite Art Show Miami, unleashing unique new experiences for those encountering Sinelnikova’s work for the first time or for the fiftieth time.

 

Julia Sinelnikova AKA the Oracle at Satellite Art Show Brooklyn
Outdoor sculpture “Sky Shard” (45ft x 15ft x 18ft) photos by Thomas Stuart Hall. On permanent view at Gilbertsville Expressive Movement NY.

The Oracle’s sculptures have been exhibited at Satellite Art Show along with upstate NY, Lazy Susan Gallery in lower Manhattan, and in Brooklyn sponsored by the NYC Parks Dept. Her work engages with the female sorceress and the feminine gaze within the framework of the cyber anime dreamscapes. Sinelnikova’s practices engages with escapist tendencies in AR/VR and her immersive contemporary art installations hold different meanings for every visitor: a place of dreams, hallucination and fulfillment.

Holographic Sculpture from The Oracle’s “Fairy Organ” series
2019 portrait of The Oracle by Yvette Tang at the artist’s studio

 

On view Dec 4-8, 2019 in Miami, FL at Satellite Art Show (2210 North Miami Court), The Oracle’s next holographic sculptures, installations and performances are a must-see for Miami-bound art lovers!

Anthropocene Blues at Wayfarers Captures our Ephemeral Moment

A certain slant of self-reflection pervades artworks on view in Anthropocene Blues, on view at Wayfarers, Brooklyn (1109 DeKalb Ave) from September 29th through October 20th, 2019. Inspired by a poem written in 2012 by one of the last remaining Beat poets, the exhibition features reference to an elegiac view of nature – one foregrounded by our current climate crisis. The poem, written by Anne Waldman, refers to a “tragedy of the Anthropocene.” Works on view for the exhibition intimate at these ongoing issues, selections soaringly curated by Jane Ursula Harris. A New York-based writer who has contributed to Art in America, Artforum, BOMB, The Paris Review & more, Harris is an art history faculty member at the School of Visual Arts.

The exhibit features works by Wayfarers member artists Kate Alboreo, Yael Azoulay, Brian Davis, George Ferrandi, Cynthia Mason, Kharis Kennedy, Kate Kosek, David McQueen, Cynthia Reynolds, Maureen O’Leary, Meredith Starr and Elise Wunderlich. Mixed-media sculptures, paintings, installation and new media all combine to showcase a considerable range of artworks on view in this exhibit. Of particular notes, Azoulay’s installation True Cover provokes vivid links to alienation and immigration by tracing the introduction of the Eucalyptus plant to Israel, where it is not native. Meredith Starr’s almost obsessively crowded installation Plastic Pools/Look At What We’ve Done suggests, in miniature, the overwhelming amount of plastic that we have hoarded and discarded through our rampant consumerist attitudes.

Installation view, “Anthropocene Blues” (painting, Maureen O’Leary and installation, Meredith Starr)

Particularly haunting is Maureen O’Leary’s painting Untitled, in which attendees at a nighttime barbecue seem look past one another, obscured by smoke and flanked by ghostly dark trees and a bright moon. O’Leary’s deft treatment of light and shadow transform a social event into a scene of foreboding: the shadow of the trees behind seem to embrace the rising smoke emanating from the cooking fire below, forming a joint visual block that crowds out the human figures in the center and right side of the picture plane. Food is being cooked and consumed. Guests are overshadowed by the forest beyond. This juxtaposition of familiar and alien, consumption and rejection, elevate O’Leary’s subject matter – as does her study of contrasts between realism and impressionism. O’Leary depicts enough to make the scene feel vaguely familiar while leaving the trails of smoke and memory to each individual’s imagination. This blend of personal and universal – the view of consumption reminds us of our presence as consumers endangering the wider environment – proves to be almost intoxicating.

Installation view, “Anthropocene Blues” (L–R, Maureen O’Leary, George Ferrandi and Meredith Starr)

On October 11th, the curator held a conversation with artist Maureen O’Leary, who has both a painting and a photograph in the show. In conversation with O’Leary, Harris noted the prominence of the firelight by remarking that fire is a primal expression of humanity’s control over nature. The conversation continued around light: O’Leary engaging in the relationship between light and human nature, our existence and our yearning for belonging, both now and in the future, on an uncertain planet. Time and light, it turns out, are intrinsically linked: the relationship between humanity’s existence and the evolution of light’s role in advances in society can be distilled – it turns out – to a single barbecue scene in the Long Island woods.

Anthropocene Blues, curated by Jane Ursula Harris and on view at Wayfarers, Brooklyn (1109 DeKalb Ave) from September 29th through October 20th, 2019, serves as the 9th Annual Juried members show at the space.