HEAL Exhibition Mines the Anthropocene, Unites Artists Toward a Greater Cause

Armory week in New York City is not for the faint of heart. What can better salve the art fair weary soul than finding a conceptually rigorous, yet relaxing, presentation of contemporary art? Enter HEAL : an art exhibition on view at Jadite galleries (413 W 50th street) from March 4-8 that brings together like-minded artists seeking an oasis from the market-driven art fair approach. The stated aim of the show, hosting a March 5th opening reception from 6-8:30 pm and featuring Ayako Bando, Vicky Barranguet, Bob Clyatt, Jacki Davis, Paul T. Davis, Danni Huang, Caroline Minchew, Robin Tedesco and Kim Zack, is to “portray…the relationship of (hu)man(kind) to nature in its current state of pivotal transition…artists in HEAL act to bolster our role in creating …a healthier ecosystem.” 

 

Kim Zack, “Nest” Mixed Medaia – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

 

Vicky Barranguet, “Love by the Yard” – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

In the spirit of harmony and ecology, Davis anchors the concept for HEAL in the scientific premise of emergence: “Emergence is a phenomenon in which groups display a seemingly intrinsic unity and harmony,” reflect Davis. “According to systems scientist Peter Corning, the qualities of emergence are as follows: (1) radical novelty (features not previously observed in systems); (2) coherence or correlation (meaning integrated wholes that maintain themselves over some period of time); (3) A global or macro “level” (i.e. there is some property of “wholeness”); (4) it is the product of a dynamical process (it evolves); and (5) it is “ostensive” (it can be perceived).” By perceiving and parsing out the manner in which emergence defines our everyday lives in the anthropocene era, HEAL bridges the gap between scientific theory and community well-being.

Bob Clyatt, “Rocks in Screen Study #4” – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

Bolstered by the support of The Art Therapy Project, HEAL seeks out ways to connect on a meaningful level and to step away from art as a commodity in order to embrace it as a conduit for meditation and self-restoration. Featuring artworks ranging from painting and new media to sculpture, mixed media and collage, HEAL metes out a conduit for self-expression that empowers and envisions a better future. Curator and artist Jacki Davis notes of the impetus to display and to create the artwork on view on HEAL that when … “we tune in and respect our environment and ourselves, the beauty of connectedness naturally unfolds in present time.” Centered in light, love, and mutual appreciation, Davis’ practice seeks out mindfulness and universality. 

Ayako Bando, “Eternal Light Towanohikati”- participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

Some artists discover pathways to healing in their practice – artist Robin Tedesco notes that healing “begins when (I) enter the studio,” while other participating artists seek more spiritual approaches to find opportunities to heal. Vicky Barranguet also reveals that her own process engages with…”being creative in some way to make an impact through my daily practice and everyday life.” Artist Bob Clyatt notes that his practice dwells in the idea of healing … “via Samsara – the state of brokenness and discord – as a way of discerning paths toward what is missing.” Caroline Minchew seeks harmony in landscapes by using it as … “an intuitive guide to understand and articulate personal and collective stories.” 

Image result for robin tedesco artist
Robin Tedesco, “Blue-Green Wave III” Oil on Panel – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

Meanwhile, the long shadow cast by nature remains firmly embedded in HEALs premise. Artist Ayako Bando reflects on the natural world as a space she mediates with her artistic practice. Artist Kim Zack’s approach embraces… “an interesting and positive message regarding natural preservation for future generations.” Meanwhile, Ayako Bando’s work features an approach to healing that… “embraces light and shadow, as she believes by seeking out eternal light we can find the source of our connection to the world at a higher level.” Where Bando seeks new narratives in light, Danni Huang works to tell ….  “compelling stories, as well as building engaging worlds that lie at the boundary of art and tech.”

Caroline Minchew, “Pond 2” – participating artist, HEAL at the Jadite Galleries (image courtesy the artist)

While it becomes clear viewing the exhibit that each participating artist reaches inner peace in different ways, what is certain is that visitors will have the ability to reconsider and reconnect with a sense of being part of the natural world. Whether discerned by means of scientific inquiry or intuited through personal observations or nature and spiritual beliefs, artists in HEAL investigate aspects of harmony and fulfillment in the works on view in this exhibition.

Danni Huang, A Long Instant #2, 2015. Detail from a Single-channel video installation (color) ©Danni Huang, courtesy of the artist and the Jadite Galleries – participating artist, HEAL

HEAL is on view at the Jadite Galleries (413 W 50th street) from March 4-8 2020. The exhibition’s opening reception takes place from 6-8:30 pm on March 5th while an artist presentation is slated for Saturday, March 7th from 4:30 pm. For more information please contact jacquelinescheeldavis@gmail.com 

Female Agency Reaches a Climax in “Female Trouble”, Western Exhibitions, Opening January 10th

Hysteria is a dirty word, and those who use it may not be aware of its context as a means of subjugating women to prejudice for.. millennia. As long ago as Ancient Greece, philosopher Hippocrates applied a related Greek term to women as a means of classifying them as incapable of rational thought. Vogue notes, “The womb, thought Plato (and Hippocrates), was believed to lurch up and down the body, upsetting a woman’s delicate constitution. This illness was called hysterike pnix, or “the suffocation of the womb,” and was believed to cause erratic and unreliable behavior.” The exhibition “Female Trouble” opens January 10, 2020 at Western Exhibitions, co-produced by the women-led Elijah Wheat Showroom, features artists Amanda Joy CalobrisiLilli Carré, Qinza NajmKathryn Refi and Frances Waite in dialogue with the legacy of misogyny pervading modern and contemporary culture, directly challenging this long-held belief through a conceptual, interdisciplinary lens.

Qinza Najm, “Red Cross” 86×63” acrylic on carpet (2019)


The topic of women’s bodies is addressed with particular fervor in “Female Trouble.” Works by the artists depict the implied body, or the power of the presence (or absence) of the female body in their works. The pervasive power balance delineating gender is at play in these works, on view at Western Exhibitions through Feb 22, 2020.

Frances Waite approaches the body as it relates to the larger environment, inhabiting both the corporeal and the Anthropocene in equal measure. The artist presents drawings that inhabit both reality and the hyper-real, envisioning humans as mammals inhabiting their larger realm.  Kathryn Refi inhabits the realm between information and interpretation, where data meets translation into results. Her work, while abstract, presents images that create an abstracted visual of our everyday lives.



Amanda Joy Calobrisi explores erotica and female empowerment- a means of embracing women’s genitals as a means of impressing power forward onto the viewers’ psyche. Lille Carré similarly implies women’s’ bodies in her interdisciplinary practice. Her clay works especially embrace both the abstract and the implications of gender simultaneously.

Qinza Najm, “4 Grey Road” 48×24” acrylic on carpet (2017)

 

Artist Qinza Najm approaches the misogynist roots of hysteria with a lens as a woman with roots in a culture historical marginalized over centuries of colonialism. She notes of her approach to the body as primary mode of interpretation in her interdisciplinary works, “I often use motifs of bodies stretched, deconstructed, distorted, and pushed beyond their limits. A manipulated body is a reflection of how power is exerted upon our being.” Perhaps there is no more appropriate encapsulation of the necessity of claiming female bodily autonomy and agency in an era in which women’s rights to claim their body as they wish are constantly being eroded by privileged men in positions of power.

“Female Trouble” remains on view from its opening Friday, January 10, 6-8 pm until February 22, 2020. More information is available on the gallery’s is website: https://westernexhibitions.com/exhibition/female-trouble/

Artist Esperanza Cortes Explores the Legacy of Mining in “Arrested Symphony” Opening Jan 4, 2020

The earth beneath our feet serves as the subject of choice for artist Esperanza Cortes in her current exhibit, “Arrested Symphony,” on view at Jonathan Ferrera gallery in New Orleans, LA with an opening celebration from 6-9 pm on Sat, Jan 4th. The artist is specifically interested in the minerals and elements that can be mined and utilized from the soil: extracted ethically or… otherwise. Cortes’ work shines a light on the darker sides of gemstones, investigating the implications of how rare and precious substances become a source of geopolitical trauma. The Colombian-born, America-based artist works with an object-based approach to examine injustice in contemporary society. The fragmentary faces and delicate, shimmering cascade of chains defining works such as “Arrested Symphony” (2017) (below) serve as both an elegy and a hopeful perspective, a longing for renewal.

 

“Arrested Symphony” (2017) clay, chains, semi precious stones, encaustic and oil on panel Image courtesy Jonathan Ferrara Gallery

The underpinning themes of injustice and the human cost of labor simmer beneath the surface of Cortes’ delicate and evocative artworks. The artist has a penchant for cretaing artwork that appeals to the sense: inspiring a lingering sense of wanting to touch: wanting to examine more closely. Her hanging installation works in particular – “Suspended Thoughts” – utilizes beads, clay and wood to comment on hierarchy and hegemony. The artist’s lingering dialogue with the effects of colonialization permeate the exhibition: a concurrent theme running alongside the inquiry into how blood diamonds and mining for uranium have been produced at tragic human cost. Cortes has the subtle talent of hinting around the issues that underpin our society. Her work serves to provoke a reconsideration of the means by which we have arrived at where we are now. Through a measured blend of texture and material, Cortes creates new pathways of discovering – and uncovering – why we are living in the world today by examining what we built in the past.

With this exhibition, the artist returns to the borders of the Carribbean that reach the shores of her homeland Colombia, as New Orleans rests on the shoulders of the Gulf of Mexico. The weight of examining the context of the post-colonial in contemporary art is especially poignant in this colonial port city. Her engagement with postcolonial dialogue persists through various fellowships with the Joan Mitchell Foundation, the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, BRIC Arts and the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Fellowship. Through these initiatives, the artist mounts a multi-disciplinary practice that continues to push the boundaries of contemporary art’s ability to grapple with this complex, convoluted legacy. The exhibit opened on December 18, and will host an opening reception on Saturday, January 4th from 6-9 pm during the New Orleans Art District’s upcoming Saturday Arts Walk. With a second opening to fête the exhibition those same evening hours on February 1, the exhibit remains open through Friday, February 14, 2020.

“Arrested Symphony” at Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, solo show of works by Esperanza Cortes on view through Feb 14, 2020

Space and Body Merge in Julia Betts’ “Ruptured Holding” at GRIDSPACE

December 15th marks the debut show at GRIDSPACE for artist Julia Betts, a sculptor based in PA. An MFA, Sculpture graduate of RISD, Betts brings her striking juxtaposition of body and material to this architecturally-driven space. This solo exhibit at GRIDSPACE, titled ruptured holding, presents an interdisciplinary window into the artist’s practice. Betts’ work relies on the contrast between the instability and unpredictability of materials presented to the public at this space, precipitously cast on the rapidly changing neighborhood of northern Crown Heights. The erasure and reclamation of identity present in works such as “Detritus” find their home within the context of a Crown Heights that even ten years ago counted very few art spaces among its residents.

From 4-6 pm on Sunday, December 15, GRIDSPACE will host a reception for Betts open to the public. Drawing from her undergraduate degree in studio art from the University of Pittsburgh toward her more recent MFA in Sculpture from RISD, the artist has a firm and mature approach to materiality and concept. In discussing the objects she employs in her practice, Betts explains her aim to destabilize existing frameworks, noting that “my work…. create(s) a uniquely precarious situation whose exact results are ambiguous and actually lead to disruption and upheaval.”

“Detritus” Julia Betts (10’x10′) 2015, ground self-images

In Betts work, the material holds as much weight conceptually as the object they comprise, daring the viewer to consider the implications of the final artwork confronting them. Mining from the same veins as pivotal artists such as Ana Mendieta, Do Huh Suh and Isa Genzken, Betts’ work advances installation farther into our current moment and inviting us to question what is presented to us for consideration. The works seem to mesmerize by their very undefinability, forming a hold on one’s psyche and creating an opening for more inquisitive looks into the very fabric of reality that surrounds us in everyday life.

 

Works such as “Accretion” reveal Betts’ engagement with pushing material to the breaking point, engaging with the adhesive, industrial material of masking tape to reveal the limits of the body. Implied motion and abstracted form combine to create the sensation of an unknown woman’s body traversing space. The labor-intensive practice also implicates the artist’s own bodily limitations in the work.

With inclusion in multiple group exhibitions in New York City such as at Re:Art Show, Microscope Gallery, and Flux Factory, Julia Betts has made her mark on the NYC art scene. She has also exhibited nationally in numerous solo shows such as at Unsmoke Systems (Pittsburgh, PA) and Bunker Projects (Pittsburgh, PA). Betts has also completed artist-in-residence programs at Millay Colony for the Arts and Virginia Center for the Creative Arts.

GRIDSPACE is an art space that serves as an architecturally specific outlet for experimentation engaging the rapidly changing neighborhood of northern Crown Heights. Located at 112 Rogers Avenue in North Crown Heights, the closest subway to the space is the 2,3,4,5 to Franklin or the S to Park Place. For any inquiries about the space, please contact  cg@cgwk.net

Uncovering Top Exhibits on View at Art Miami 2019

Navigating the complex paths presented to visitors at Art Miami is no small feat. Faced with the mountain of galleries on view, we’ve pulled together a handy reference guide for must-see presentations at this year’s Art Miami. Located at One Herald Plaza in Miami (NE 14th Street and Biscayne Bay,) the fair shares the grounds with its sister fair, Context.

From secondary market prospects to mid-career artists, Art Miami marks a diverse cross-section of modern and contemporary art reflecting a wide assembly of tastes. From the merging of digital and material to the large-scale mid-century modernists, no other fair holds quite the range of gems on display at Art Miami.

Make sure to survey the show, and keep an eye out for the following art galleries (Booth numbers indicated below.)

Kenneth Noland, “Mysteries: Wild at Heart” at Helwaser Gallery (Art Miami 2019) Courtesy of Helwaser Gallery, New York. Photography: Hadi Fallaphisheh

Helwaser Gallery (AM521) – Featuring sculpture, mixed media and works on paper, Helwaser’s presentations span from the mid-century to late 20th century. “Shadenfreude” by John Chamberlain lies at the outskirts of the booth, enticing passersby, while various works by the likes of Noland, Condo and LeWitt offer insights into these artists’ practice. Helwaser’s clean and meticulous presentation only serve to heighten the quality of the artworks on view. A definite stop on any fair-goers list.

C24 Gallery (AM304) – Stunning combinations of scale and material wait to delight visitors to C24’s Art Miami presentation. Christian Vincent, Katja Loher and Mike Dargas present compelling visions at the booth, with Dargas’ paintings taking honey as a departure point for imagining new visual textures. Katja Loher’s mixed media digital installations confound, while Christian Vincent’s representational paintings leave narratives to the viewer’s imagination. Not far from the VIP lounge, C24 is easy to discover and well worth the visit.

“Veil 2” Christian Vincent at C24 Gallery (Art Miami 2019)

Berry Campbell (AM122) – Frank Wimberley and Syd Solomon steal the show at Berry Campbell gallery’s presentation, while stunning pieces by Nancy Graves, Elaine de Kooning and others round out an impressive survey of painters and mixed-media artists spanning from the post-war period to the present day. Wimberley’s ruminations on texture and minimalism alone feel shockingly contemporary. Syd Solomon’s work will be featured in an upcoming solo show at the Ringling Museum of Art in Sarasota, so take a peek at his works on view here to familiarize yourself with his style and deft mastery of color tones.

“Morning Lightsigns” Syd Solomon at Berry Campbell (Art Miami 2019)

 

Goya Contemporary (AM111) – Baltimore-based Goya Contemporary presents Louise Fishman and Louisa Chase along with Joyce J. Scott and Elizabeth Talford Scott at this compelling Art Miami presentation. Open over 20 years, Goya Contemporary and Goya-Girl Press play a definitive role in the arts community in Baltimore and have helped secure the legacy of Baltimore-based artists while also exhibiting international renowned artists such as Louise Bourgeois. This compelling survey of paintings and sculptures offers incredible access to modern and contemporary artists, particularly woman artists, in a fair that benefits from this diverse showing.

Joyce J Scott, “Lips” Goya Contemporary Art (Art Miami 2019)

The Bonnier Gallery (AM402) – Miami-based Bonnier Gallery presents inside looks into the practice of established artists such as Christo and Mark di Suvero. Featuring drawings, sculpture and mixed-media work, The Bonnier Gallery is a local stalwart with an international focus. Focused on minimalism and with significant conceptual art on hand, the gallery marks a breath of fresh air in a market leaning heavily on Pop Art. A must-see.

Christo, “Museum of Contemporary Art Chicago (Packed)” The Bonnier Gallery (Art Miami 2019)

James Goodman Gallery (AM218) – Early works by Milton Avery and other mid-century Modern painters populate James Goodman Gallery’s Art Miami booth. The options for collectors seeking obscure works by artists in the established canon are endless. Jim Dine, Sam Francis and others populate the robust offerings on hand at James Goodman, with a range of paintings and sculpture greeting the visitor. Another centrally located booth on view, James Goodman Gallery is well worth checking out.

detail of a painting by Milton Avery, James Goodman Gallery (Art Miami 2019)

 

Whether seeking out a study by a Modern Master or seeking something fresh and contemporary, Art Miami has a wide array of gems hidden in plain sight. Grab a cocktail and wander through the fairs – a Frank Stella, Sol LeWitt or soon-to-be future Warhol awaits you out on the floor!

Damien Davis Empowers Discourse at LatchKey Gallery’s UNTITLED (Booth A7)

Foregrounding the artist’s upcoming pivotal show with the enduring, emblematic Weeksville Heritage Center in Brooklyn, NY, “Collapse: Black Wall Street Study” by Damien Davis marks the artist’s inaugural solo showing with LatchKey Gallery at UNTITLED (Miami Beach – Beach @ 12th) and a powerful investigation of materiality and conceptual rigor. The artist’s research-based practice upends conventional understandings of African-American history, revealing the narratives commonly buried under the surface. “Collapse: Black Wall Street Study” is on view for the duration of UNTITLED at Booth A7 (Dec 4-8, 2019.)

 

Above details from Damien Davis’ “Pre-Check (Blackamoors Collage #280)” Laser-cut plexiglas and stainless steel hardware, 14x10x2″

Davis’ works embrace a keen grasp of formal composition, embedding careful details into meticulously cut plexiglas shapes attached using metal fasteners. These industrial materials allude to the lexicon of labor intrinsically tied into entrenched views of African-American history, outmoded means of regarding black Americans still haunting our contemporary society. Davis draws from a pared-down color palette and specific, enduring iconography intrinsic to both the Black and Southern vernaculars – images that question where these two identities overlap, as well as their points of divergence. Davis himself speaks of discrete images – separate and distinct – that define his installations, drawing each element into conversation with an overarching whole, yet making distinct boundaries palpable for these works on view at UNTITLED – and later the Weeksville site.

LatchKey Gallery presents this new series by Damien Davis which visually investigates the murder of a minimum of three hundred black residents of Greenwood, Oklahoma in the early 1920s. As we near the hundredth anniversary of this massacre, COLLAPSE: Black Wall Street Study seeks to create new means of entering into a dialogue on the progress that has (or has not) been made with regards to civil rights, representation, visibility, and reparations for descendants of former slaves. Davis does not shy away from the tough conversations, yet invites others to respond authentically and inquisitively to his work. The artist will host an on-site activation of his work every day during the UNTITLED show hours at 4 pm exactly, while the artist will be in conversation with curators Natalya Mills and Larry Ossei-Mensah on Dec 6 at 2 pm.

Damien Davis, “Muddy (Blackamoors Collage #301″ Laser-cut plexiglas and stainless steel hardware, 12.5x10x2”

Damien Davis is a Brooklyn-based artist. Born in Crowley, LA and raised in Phoenix, AZ, Davis centers his practice in historical representations of blackness by unpacking the visual language of various cultures. The artist investigates how these societies code and decode representations of race through craft, design and digital modes of production. Davis has shown at The Whitney Museum of American Art, Museum of Modern Art, Museum of Arts and Design, and Sugar Hill Children’s Museum of Art and Storytelling among others. He has also presented solo exhibitions in Philadelphia and Seattle, as well as Reading Pennsylvania and Richmond, Virginia, and his work has been included in group exhibitions across the US as well as in Hiroshima, Japan and Florence, Italy.

 

Damien Davis, “Homegoing Letters (Blackamoors Collage #282″ Laser-cut plexiglas and stainless steel hardware, 10.5×12.5×2”

For further information, please contact Amanda Uribe or Natalie Kates at info@latchkeygallery.com.

 

The Oracle Alights: New Visions from Julia Sinelnikova at Miami’s Satellite Art Fair

Disorienting twinkling lights move through sinuous sculptural forms. Sparkling silver surfaces spin, bouncing beams of light in patterns like a disco ball.
The Oracle (AKA Julia Sinelnikova) always has new adventures in wait for visitors encountering her newest holographic sculptures, and this Dec 4-8 at Satellite Art Show Miami event will be no different. Installations and performances will supplement brand new hand-cut holographic sculptures, on view in The Oracle’s Satellite Art Show in Miami, Florida.
Julia Sinelnikova AKA the Oracle at Satellite Art Show Brooklyn

Coming off the heels of a successful presentation at Satellite Art Show in Brooklyn, NY – Sinelnikova’s installation images made the cover page of Artnet and was listed as a top NYC art event – the next phase of the artist’s sculptures will take viewers on a mystical multi-dimensional adventure. Taking cues from her existing Fairy Organ series along with her recent “Sky Shard” installation in Gilbertsville, NY, The Oracle creates new pathways of holographic art experiences for visitors to Satellite Art Show Miami, unleashing unique new experiences for those encountering Sinelnikova’s work for the first time or for the fiftieth time.

 

Julia Sinelnikova AKA the Oracle at Satellite Art Show Brooklyn
Outdoor sculpture “Sky Shard” (45ft x 15ft x 18ft) photos by Thomas Stuart Hall. On permanent view at Gilbertsville Expressive Movement NY.

The Oracle’s sculptures have been exhibited at Satellite Art Show along with upstate NY, Lazy Susan Gallery in lower Manhattan, and in Brooklyn sponsored by the NYC Parks Dept. Her work engages with the female sorceress and the feminine gaze within the framework of the cyber anime dreamscapes. Sinelnikova’s practices engages with escapist tendencies in AR/VR and her immersive contemporary art installations hold different meanings for every visitor: a place of dreams, hallucination and fulfillment.

Holographic Sculpture from The Oracle’s “Fairy Organ” series
2019 portrait of The Oracle by Yvette Tang at the artist’s studio

 

On view Dec 4-8, 2019 in Miami, FL at Satellite Art Show (2210 North Miami Court), The Oracle’s next holographic sculptures, installations and performances are a must-see for Miami-bound art lovers!